Caregiver facility – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 20:49:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wendyfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Caregiver facility – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ 32 32 What are the hospice options? https://wendyfoundation.org/what-are-the-hospice-options/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 18:07:47 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/what-are-the-hospice-options/ Realizing that a loved one may need palliative care can reinforce these misconceptions. This is why, according to Polikov, conversations about palliative care should take place as soon as possible. “People think hospice comes in and stops everything, hastening death, but the treatment really respects the body and what it does naturally while it lives […]]]>

Realizing that a loved one may need palliative care can reinforce these misconceptions. This is why, according to Polikov, conversations about palliative care should take place as soon as possible.

“People think hospice comes in and stops everything, hastening death, but the treatment really respects the body and what it does naturally while it lives its natural length,” Polikov said.

To look at palliative care outside of a personal scenario where someone is already dying is to see it objectively. This may make it easier for you, as a loved one or as someone at the end of life, to decide that this is the right treatment option.

“It’s very scary when families and individuals are faced with a life-threatening illness, but comfort care doesn’t mean giving up,” Jennifer Prescott RN, MSN, CDP at Blue Water Hospice told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution .

Prescott suggests talking with loved ones about their wishes as they get older and getting everything important in writing. As an aging person, this allows you to make it easier for your family to deal with any potential illnesses that may arise. It also allows you to plan ahead to ensure you get the treatment you want.

But having these conversations at any stage means talking about death – and that’s often very difficult. However, overcoming discomfort can create a safe space to express your wishes and desires as you near the end of your life.

“It’s not always an easy conversation because people don’t want to talk about death. Sometimes it’s all about the practicalities. Others are numb and can’t have much conversation about it,” Rabbi Judith Beiner, community chaplain for Jewish Family & Career Services Atlanta, told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Arriving at the need for palliative care should not occur without the input of a medical professional.

Usually it is first deemed medically necessary or appropriate, based on various signs. First and foremost, a person must have a progressive disease that causes physical and mental changes.

Other signs include a rapid decline in health, frequent hospitalizations, decreased alertness and willingness to eat, unsuccessful medical treatments, and an increased need for assistance with basic activities.

“Hospice is a service used when an illness reaches a point where treatment ceases to offer the potential to control or cure it,” Prescott said.

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Although the conversation may begin at the insistence of a doctor, it is also up to you to defend your case or that of your loved one.

“If you just feel like things are changing, you can talk to someone and see if hospice is an option. If not, you’ll learn more about what to look for,” Polikov said.

Entering palliative care, whether you opt for a hospital or home-based experience, changes the focus from treating illness to managing symptoms and pain.

“Hospice goals focus on managing pain and symptoms and improving quality of life without resorting to aggressive treatment,” Prescott said.

Although palliative care plans are unique to each patient, the types of services provided include pain and symptom management, bereavement care and support, and other special services. Care also includes assisting the patient and family members with the emotional, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of death.

You also have different care options under the hospice umbrella; you don’t have to choose one and stick to it all the time. The most common type of palliative care is routine palliative care. This is done in the patient’s home. Ongoing palliative care is also provided at home but involves between 8 and 24 hours of care per day to manage pain and acute symptoms. This service is mainly provided by a nurse.

The other two care options take place in a hospital setting. In-hospital respite care provides temporary relief to the caregiver who lives at home with the patient. This means the patient leaves home for a short time and receives care in a hospital, hospice or other long-term care facility.

General inpatient care transfers all care to a Medicare-certified hospital, hospice, or nursing facility where the person can receive direct care around the clock if needed.

These choices raise another concern for families deciding to place a loved one in a nursing home: where should they be? Home may seem like the most comfortable choice, but according to Beiner, inpatient facilities won’t feel like a hospital and shouldn’t be overlooked.

“When a person enters a hospice, (the) family can come and go. The peace you can feel as a family with this type of care is the best we can do for families in keeping the dying comfortable and dignified,” Beiner said.

As a chaplain, Beiner sees many palliative care patients at the very end of their life course. Its main purpose is to give “everyone a purpose” in this last phase of life, “bringing God and holiness into the room”.

“In our society, we are so afraid of touching death, but in those moments there is always love and we are there, because it happens together. We are not afraid in the moment, and all the emotions are real. These are the times when we’re all human,” Beiner said.

After establishing the place of care as well as the plan of care, the next concern may be cost. Medicare covers 100% palliative care, but at home, that doesn’t translate to full care. Although hospice is the highest level of home care, it consists of skilled home visits rather than 24-hour care.

Regardless of the setting, a focus on the emotional well-being of the patient and their family members is an essential component of care. This refers to the philosophy that drives all palliative care, of which hospice is a part. The entire interdisciplinary approach is dedicated to optimizing the quality of life of any patient with a serious or chronic disease.

Palliative care can be provided at any time during an illness and is often given in conjunction with curative measures. However, if these curative measures cease to be useful, a patient can move on to palliative care.

The two terms are not interchangeable, which Polikov hopes people will remember.

“Hospice is a form of palliative care offered at the terminal stage of an illness; it is a stage of palliative care only,” Polikov said.

According to the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, the average length of hospice stay was just under 93 days in 2019.

Either way, all palliative care plans are created to meet the specific needs of the individual and are often adjusted over and over. At the heart of the care plan, you will always find the patient.

“The goal of hospice is to enable people to live their best lives every day by caring rather than curing,” Prescott said.

There are a variety of resources available for those who want to learn more about palliative care. Prescott recommends families first speak with friends and the patient’s healthcare team to get referrals. Polikov suggests calling local facilities to ask questions. Online, caringinfo.org provides patients and caregivers with tools applicable to this stage of life.

For news and specialized articles on aging in place, health information and more, subscribe to our Aging in Atlanta Newsletter.

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Caregiving can upset your retirement plans https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiving-can-upset-your-retirement-plans/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 16:42:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiving-can-upset-your-retirement-plans/ By Richard Eisenberg 8 tips for providing help – and helping yourself You start your retirement with idyllic dreams of all the things you’ll now have time to do, plus maybe some part-time work and volunteering, and then, whammo: you’re suddenly pushed to become a caregiver. a parent, parent-in-law or spouse. The best thought plans… […]]]>

By Richard Eisenberg

8 tips for providing help – and helping yourself

You start your retirement with idyllic dreams of all the things you’ll now have time to do, plus maybe some part-time work and volunteering, and then, whammo: you’re suddenly pushed to become a caregiver. a parent, parent-in-law or spouse.

The best thought plans…

There are some things you can – and probably should – do to help yourself and your loved one if you’re a retired caregiver, as I’ll explain shortly.

Nearly one in five caregivers is over age 65, according to the AARP/National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC) survey; Care in USA 2020. Most of them are helping a parent, step-parent, spouse or partner.

Caregiving and early retirement

“Caregiving can often take people out of the workforce much sooner than they thought and can lead to retirement earlier than expected,” says Meredith Stoddard, head of life events experience at Fidelity. Investments.

For some caregivers, says Christina Irving, director of client services for the Family Caregiver Alliance, “the cost of home care ends up exceeding their income” from work.

According to the AARP/NAC survey, 15% of respondents have moved from full-time work to part-time work or reduced work hours, while 6% have quit their job completely and 5% have taken early retirement.

According to a 2019 Government Accountability Office report, supporting spouses are more likely than supporting parents to reduce their working hours, give up work altogether, or retire early.

But, says Irving, “most of the time people aren’t prepared for what it means to be a caregiver.”

How caregiving changed this couple’s retirement

Laura Wood and her husband John fit that bill. They retired about three years ago, leaving Virginia for sunny Pensacola, Florida with high expectations. “We were hoping to spend more time with our three adult children who are scattered across the country and see my mother-in-law or bring her over,” says Laura.

Two years after retiring, the Woods realized that Laura’s widowed mother in New Jersey had developed memory problems that required assistance. So Laura’s mother moved in with them.

“I knew it would be a big change. I didn’t know how big this change was going to be,” says Laura. The responsibility, she adds, “is daunting at times – and the fact that you’re sort of on call 24/7”. Plus, she notes, the role reversal of essentially becoming your parents’ parent “just puts an emotional and difficult layer on things that can make it even more difficult.”

Laura’s mother lived with the Woods until May 2022; she now lives in a memory care center in Pensacola, where Laura visits her four days a week. “My husband said many times, ‘You know, our life always revolves around her.’ And to some extent, that’s true.”

Jonathan Davis, CEO of family caregiver training platform Trualta, says: “All the time we hear of people entering what they expect to be a carefree time in their lives only to be thrown into caregiving. seemingly overnight. Not only does their outlook on retirement change, but their financial situation and mental state are also impacted.”

The Effects of Caregiving on Caregivers

As a new report from the National Alliance for Caregiving and the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors notes: “Caregivers face an increased risk of poor health and financial insecurity. Medicare doesn’t usually cover the cost of home care, so caregivers are usually responsible — sometimes for thousands of dollars a year.

When you become a family caregiver, like 53 million Americans are, you might suddenly find yourself becoming a combination of financial planner, medical assistant and psychologist for your loved one.

The caregiver role, writes Kimberly Fraser in her forthcoming book “The Accidental Caregiver,” is “everything consuming – physically, spiritually and emotionally.” Some 36% of caregivers surveyed by AARP and NAC said caregiving meant “high emotional stress.”

Most caregivers surveyed by AARP and NAC (53%) felt they had no choice but to take on this responsibility.

“You don’t sit down and say, ‘Well, you know, what are the pros and cons? Just do it,” says Susanne White, the author of “Self-Care for Caregivers” who cared for her parents.

Finding meaning and purpose through caregiving

However, being a caregiver can also give you meaning and purpose in retirement. In fact, 51% of caregivers surveyed by AARP and NAC said being a caregiver gave them purpose.

“There are a lot of positives in caregiving, and it can be hard to remember them when you’re on your daily grind and feeling stressed and overwhelmed,” says Irving. “But finding the purpose of caregiving in your life can actually help build resilience.”

You might find purpose in sharing the helping skills you learned with others earlier in their helping journey.

8 tips for providing care in retirement

Some suggestions if you are — or will be — a retired caregiver:

Ask for help. “You can’t do it on your own,” White says. “Be really honest with yourself and say, ‘I can’t do this’ and reach out to others and say, ‘I need help’.” If you get help, she adds, you’ll be more rested and healed.

Start by enrolling your family members and friends. A July 2022 Fidelity Investments survey of carers of disabled or special-needs loved ones found that 57% said supporting friends and family helped them the most during the initial transition from the role of caregiver. caregiver.

“If there are tensions within your family, you might consider bringing in an outside facilitator like a case manager, therapist, or someone from a faith community,” Irving says.

However, it can be difficult to find support outside of your family.

“Retired caregivers may have friends and colleagues who are still working or who are able to enjoy their retirement as they hoped,” says Irving. “So maybe they don’t have that support network that understands what they’re going through and there can be some resentment that comes from that.”

In “The Accidental Caregiver,” Kimberly Fraser also recommends searching online for local or virtual support groups with phrases like “family caregiver support,” “caregiver support group,” and “people caregiver support group.” affected by ____________”.

Irving notes, “Caregiver support groups can be a great resource just to be able to empathize with people who are going through a similar journey and can relate to all of the emotions that come with it.”

If you need help learning how to manage your loved one’s medical tasks – from bathing and caring for wounds to giving injections and administering medication to your loved one – ask a healthcare professional. health. “These are tasks that people go to school for, but families end up getting them,” Irving says.

In about 40 states, CARE law requires hospitals to provide family caregivers with training and instruction on the medical tasks they will perform for the patient at home.

YouTube can also offer helpful instructional videos.

Take care of yourself. “Many recent retirees experience tremendous stress due to the physical and mental burden of caregiving and their inability to experience what they were looking for,” says Trualta’s Davis.

Fidelity found that 70% of caregivers of loved ones with disabilities or special needs were so focused on caregiving tasks that they were slow to meet their own needs. But, says Irving, “taking care of your health is good for the caregiver and benefits the person they care for.”

Self-care, says White, makes all the difference for you and your loved one. “If you get sick, who will take care of them?” she asks.

Fraser’s book suggests an assortment of self-care strategies from going for a walk and practicing deeper breathing to calling a friend and taking care of your health. Repeat to yourself, she wrote, “It’s good to take some time for me.”

Set limits. This is something that many caregivers struggle to do, White says.

“When you put boundaries, you might think you’re a bad caregiver or not a good person,” she notes. “But especially when you’re retired and you start caring for someone, you have to set boundaries. Ask yourself, ‘What serves me that I can serve them?'”

Meet with the doctor(s) of the person you are caring for. Fraser, a former nurse and health care aide, suggests in her book asking the doctor questions such as: Where should I seek home care? and Where can I look for funding programs to help pay for medical equipment or supplies?

Your loved one’s doctor may authorize a visit from a nurse or physiotherapist or occupational therapist who can teach you certain skills that you will be providing day to day and if deemed medically necessary may be covered by insurance,” Irving said.

Investigate national and local resources. The Family Caregiver Alliance offers webinars, courses and workshops for caregivers. The Alzheimer’s Association has a helpful website and a toll-free helpline. Regional agencies on aging can be helpful (find yours via the government’s aged care locator).

Trualta offers free caregiver education materials online for residents of 27 states, including an emergency planning handbook; Wood used them and found them extremely useful.

Investigate the possibility of being paid for your help. The US Department of Veterans Affairs, state Medicaid plans, and some long-term care insurance policies sometimes reimburse family caregivers. In some cases, loved ones who need care pay family members for their help. Wood’s mother paid her and her husband a monthly amount for expenses related to living with them.

If your loved one isn’t in a long-term care facility but might need it one day, start researching local options. “My husband started considering long-term care for my mom five months before she had a stroke. And I’m so grateful to him for that,” Wood says.

(MORE TO BE FOLLOWED) Dow Jones Newswires

09-29-22 1242ET

Copyright (c) 2022 Dow Jones & Company, Inc.

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Orphan forced to leave Christian home underlines Islamic ban on… | News and reports https://wendyfoundation.org/orphan-forced-to-leave-christian-home-underlines-islamic-ban-on-news-and-reports/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 16:23:16 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/orphan-forced-to-leave-christian-home-underlines-islamic-ban-on-news-and-reports/ Four years ago, Shenouda was found on the doorstep of a Coptic church. Now renamed Yusuf, the boy is found in a public orphanage. In between are the cares of a priest, the devastation of a Christian family, and a sectarian bureaucracy undergoing partial reform. Egypt is home to a Dickensian tragedy. “Adoption is not […]]]>

Four years ago, Shenouda was found on the doorstep of a Coptic church. Now renamed Yusuf, the boy is found in a public orphanage. In between are the cares of a priest, the devastation of a Christian family, and a sectarian bureaucracy undergoing partial reform.

Egypt is home to a Dickensian tragedy.

“Adoption is not legal in Egypt,” said Nermien Riad, executive director of Coptic Orphans. “There is no possibility of this happening as it is known in the western world.”

The boy’s surname and location have been kept anonymous as a precaution, as the Coptic publication reports. Watani. Presumably left by a single mother, the child was found by a Coptic priest who presented him to the couple, who had been infertile for 29 years.

They welcomed him into their home, obtained a birth certificate as their own, and raised him with love and devotion. They gave him a first name meaning Christian, honoring the former Coptic Orthodox pope, and according to Egyptian naming custom, the four-generation quadrangle was completed with the names of father, grandfather and great-grandfather. – beloved father.

Everything was idyllic, until a jealous niece realized the impact on her legacy.

Egyptian Islamic law, which seeks to preserve lineage, forbids taking someone else’s child as one’s own. The niece reported the couple to the police, who investigated. The prosecution determined that there was no blood connection, but also no ill will.

The father signed a paper stating that he had found the child “in the street”, likely to protect the involvement of the priest. But although the case was dropped last February, the boy was taken to an orphanage. Without papers to prove his ancestry, he was assumed to be Muslim – and therefore forbidden to live with a Christian family – and given the religiously neutral name Yusuf, the Arabic equivalent of Joseph.

The desperate parents protested: What Muslim would leave his unwanted child in a church? Rejected, they were even forbidden to visit him at the orphanage. Their applications for employment in the establishment were rejected.

According to the Ministry of Social Solidarity, Egypt has 11,000 children placed in institutions. According to a 2016 study by UNICEF, the United Nations children’s agency, the total number of Egyptian children with at least one parent dead is 1.2 million.

Not all have a sad ending.

“It turned out better than I could have hoped for,” said Rasha Mekki, who discovered Egypt. kafala program in his mid-40s after 20 years of IVF treatments. She visited orphanages for a month, completed government paperwork, and returned home with Mostafa.

Kafala means “sponsorship” in Arabic, somewhat akin to foster care.

Today, Mekki lives with her husband and not quite her son in San Francisco where she runs Yalla Kafala, a nonprofit founded in 2020 to promote “adoption” in Egypt. Its goal is an Egypt without orphans by 2030.

She is less ambitious than the Egyptian government, which has set a target date of 2025 to close all orphanages in the country due to widespread child abuse, neglect and overcrowding. The 2020 reforms allowed single, divorced and unmarried women over 30 to apply kafalaand lowered the level of education needed for one of the spouses to have a high school diploma.

Last year, further reforms allowed for a partial name change. After consultation with al-Azhar, based in Cairo, the main center of scholarship in the Sunni Muslim world, the Egyptian government allowed the sponsoring parents to give the child the name of the father in the second position of the quadrangle, or the name of family in fourth place. position, but not both designations.

Combined with a scenario on kafala by the popular “Why not? Egyptian mini-series, requests jumped to 2,700 in 2021, the highest number ever. Yet still far short of the total number of people in need, many orphans are seen as the unwanted children of sin and suffer from severe social stigma.

Even from those willing to try: A couple, after welcoming a child through the kafala system, fired the three-year-old girl after his wife became pregnant.

Another advocate chastised orphanages in general, while acknowledging that their workers are doing their best.

“She will be raised by adoptive ‘mothers’ who are employed to care for her, who are overworked and underpaid,” Yasmina El Habbal, a single woman in her 40s, said in the post. her experience raising Baby Ghalia on her public Facebook. page. “‘Mothers’ who will leave to marry and be replaced.”

Mekki strives to remind Muslims that caring for orphans – Muhammad was one himself – is a great deed in Islam. And although the formal rules of inheritance exclude kafala As a child, Sharia allows any number of “gifts” to be given during the parents’ lifetime. Additionally, their will may specify up to one-third of any inheritance distributed after their death to other than their legal heirs.

Breastfeed a kafala child, furthermore, removes the ban on non-familial gender mixing, allowing women to keep their heads uncovered after a sponsored boy matures.

Raymond Ibrahim, writing for Coptic Solidarity, was a critic. Citing Muslim stories, he told how the Prophet of Islam adopted Zayd, an orphan believed to be the fourth person to accept the faith. But the practice became banned when Zayd divorced his wife and Muhammad later married her. Kafala took its place and a precedent was set.

And Christians are among the modern victims.

“The reason Shenouda and his family were targeted is because of their Christian faith,” Ibrahim wrote. “The child – whose background is unknown – was raised as a Christian, and that’s what prompted the state to act.”

Some critics say the Egyptian government should not have such a right. Article 3 of the Egyptian constitution allows Christians and Jews to manage their own personal status issues, such as marriage, divorce and inheritance, according to their religious traditions.

“If we submit this question to the religious concept, adoption is permitted in Christianity, but the opposite in Islam,” said Youssef Talaat, legal adviser to the Protestant Churches of Egypt (PCE). “But the current law has no articles relating to it.”

Talaat represented the PCE alongside the Coptic Orthodox and Catholic churches to present a new unified personal status law to the government. Completed last year, it is expected to be discussed in the next session of parliament, although due to Egypt’s Sharia-based ban – with kafala as an alternative — adoption (tabennis) is not included in the new text.

Coptic lawyer Naguib Suleiman wants parliament to make further changes to the family bill, and it looks like some members will push to allow adoption for Christians.

Until then, where will the orphans go?

“In the absence of a legal framework, civil society organizations must step in and fill the void,” Riad said. “Our work prevents Shenouda’s situation from happening.”

Coptic Orphans, founded in 1988, works in approximately 800 cities and towns across Egypt. Currently serving 9,000 orphans, the organization says it has helped keep 35,000 children out of residential care.

A 2017 article in the academic journal Trauma, violence and abuse surveyed 23 studies over 20 years, involving a total of more than 13,000 children. Those raised in foster care had “consistently better experiences and fewer problems” than those in orphanages.

For example, in 2009, American scientist published research on 136 children in Romania. At age 3.5, only 18% of institutionalized children demonstrated secure attachment to their primary caregiver. But 49% of those in foster care have done so, and 65% of those in the community at large.

Working in cooperation with church-affiliated orphanages, Coptic Orphans aims to place vulnerable people in the care of loved ones. And Riad specified that most of the orphans supported by the Christian network are not entirely supported: 95% of the beneficiaries have a mother. But when the father dies, is imprisoned or otherwise disappears, the family is often plunged into poverty.

Even in cases where the mother is also deceased, the extended family network steps in, bolstered by financial assistance from Coptic Orphans. This makes kafala unnecessary, and the government does not need to be involved. And in the rare case where parentage is unknown, the church will quietly place the child with a family.

Spiritual support is also offered. “Typically it is the priest who places the child with a family,” Riad said. “They know their community and the necessary arrangements better than any social worker.”

Riad commended the government’s efforts to expand and promote kafala. But she wonders how Egypt will be able to care for all the children, if plans continue to close the orphanages.

Yet, just as the country’s Christians once had to circumvent the law to build churches until reformation happens, she hopes adoption will be included in legal revisions. And not just for rare examples like Shenouda, but for all Coptic children who need care.

“Families are already ‘adopting’ informally, in the shadows,” Riad said. “If there is legalization for Christians, that would be ideal.”

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AV Fair Fun Days Are Back | New https://wendyfoundation.org/av-fair-fun-days-are-back-new/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/av-fair-fun-days-are-back-new/ LANCASTER – The Antelope Valley Fair and Alfalfa Festival kicked off eight days of fun on Friday night as thousands of visitors walked through the doors for the first time in three years after the fair was canceled during for the past two years due to security measures due to the covid19 Pandemic. Under the […]]]>

LANCASTER – The Antelope Valley Fair and Alfalfa Festival kicked off eight days of fun on Friday night as thousands of visitors walked through the doors for the first time in three years after the fair was canceled during for the past two years due to security measures due to the covid19 Pandemic.

Under the theme “What a Ride!” — a nod to the ups and downs of the past two years — the 82nd edition of the event opened in the fall for the first time in decades after moving from its former location in August.

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Democrat Traci Gere vs. Republican Elizabeth Jordan in House District 134 https://wendyfoundation.org/democrat-traci-gere-vs-republican-elizabeth-jordan-in-house-district-134/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:30:24 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/democrat-traci-gere-vs-republican-elizabeth-jordan-in-house-district-134/ KENNEBUNKPORT — Incumbent Democrat Traci Gere faces a November 8 challenge from Republican Elizabeth Jordan in the race for Maine House of Representatives District 134. Both live in Kennebunkport. The district includes Kennebunkport and parts of Biddeford and Kennebunk. We asked the candidates to tell us a bit about themselves; their previous political experience, if […]]]>

KENNEBUNKPORT — Incumbent Democrat Traci Gere faces a November 8 challenge from Republican Elizabeth Jordan in the race for Maine House of Representatives District 134. Both live in Kennebunkport.

The district includes Kennebunkport and parts of Biddeford and Kennebunk.

We asked the candidates to tell us a bit about themselves; their previous political experience, if any; their top four or five priorities and why they think they are the best person for the job.

Traci Gere Courtesy picture

• Gere, 58, is completing her first term as a state representative. She said her goal is to make Maine and the communities it serves a more affordable place to live and work, including increasing the availability of housing for working families, making income sharing of the state to municipalities and holding electric utilities accountable for rates and customer service.

Gere is married with two adult children and is Director of Development at Museum LA in Lewiston. She has lived in Kennebunkport for 14 years and has an MBA from Boston University and an undergraduate degree from Brown University. She ran her own business and was involved with nonprofits — essential tools for legislative work, she said.

“During the last legislature, we invested in job training and internship programs, helping Maine residents develop their job skills and become effective contributors to our economy,” Gere said. “We must continue to invest in Maine’s most important asset — our people. I will continue to work for policies that support our public schools and teachers, invest in post-secondary education, and connect Maine people to productive and fulfilling careers.

Erosion and flooding are impacting coastal infrastructure, she said. “I will work with the Maine Climate Council and Action Plan to ensure that we continue to have the resources needed to understand and mitigate the impacts of climate change,” Gere said.

She pledged to defend Maine laws and policies that guarantee the right to abortion and would vote to keep the government out of private health care decisions.

“I will always vote to protect women’s right to abortion as an essential part of the continuum of women’s health care,” Gere said. “Pregnancy carries many risks, and a number of conditions require abortion treatment because of the threat to the mother of sepsis, death, and loss of reproductive organs. Abortion care is also a necessary treatment for the physical and mental health of victims of rape and incest.Finally, women must have the right to make, in collaboration with our health care providers, the complex reproductive health decisions that affect our bodies, our families and all aspects of our lives.

Gere said she learned to build coalitions and worked with all parties to develop and pass laws and prioritize serving her constituents.

“I have a deep connection to our community and a demonstrated commitment to protecting and improving the well-being of the people of our district,” she said.

Elizabeth Jordan Courtesy picture

• Jordan, 62, said she would work to ease Maine’s tax burden, pledged to do all she could to reduce food and energy costs and is said to be concerned about school children and the elderly in Maine.

Jordan was widowed six years ago after 30 years of marriage and has three adult children and three grandchildren. She earned a Bachelor of Science from Virginia Commonwealth University. She returned to Maine after 40 years and works part-time at a health food store. She said she lost her job at a nursing facility because of the COVID warrants.

The House 134 race is her first contest as a candidate, although she has previously been delegated to city and county committees and supported candidates and issues.

“I will work to ease the tax burden that is so heavy on us here in Maine,” Jordan said. “We are the third highest taxed state in the United States. This is unacceptable. Especially since we are among the lowest income states.

She said she would work to do what is necessary to reduce food and fuel costs.

“I’m also very concerned about our school children,” Jordan said. “We are now seeing the tragic cost of lockdowns and we are also seeing the exposure of ‘social-emotional learning’ that has replaced the ‘three Rs’ in education. Our children and our teachers are hurt by these programs, and both are coming out of the public school system. »

She expressed concern for the elderly and health care workers.

“Staff shortages were common before COVID, but are now much worse due to unchecked emergency powers and illegal warrants,” Jordan said. “I have learned from listening to people that many are suffering unnecessarily because of this mismanagement. I will work to change that.

She said her life has been dedicated to caring for others as a wife and mother, teacher and carer in paid and unpaid roles. “I had to learn how to balance a checkbook and maintain a budget, and how to be creative in finding solutions to many kinds of problems,” she said. “I ran an agricultural cooperative from my home and always supported local small businesses.”

Jordan said she believes people in Maine know best what they need. “We who serve in government should represent their interests, not interfere in their lives or impose their day-to-day decisions.”

” Previous

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Caregiver arrested for elder abuse at Gainesville Aged Facility https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiver-arrested-for-elder-abuse-at-gainesville-aged-facility/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 22:24:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiver-arrested-for-elder-abuse-at-gainesville-aged-facility/ GAINESVILLE, Fla. (WCJB) — Gainesville police arrested Daja Rutledge, 24, on Monday for elder abuse at Charter Senior Living on Southwest 62nd Boulevard. Police say the victims were an 80-year-old woman and an 82-year-old woman in Rutledge’s custody. A witness told police he saw Rutledge cover the 80-year-old resident’s nose and mouth with his hand […]]]>

GAINESVILLE, Fla. (WCJB) — Gainesville police arrested Daja Rutledge, 24, on Monday for elder abuse at Charter Senior Living on Southwest 62nd Boulevard.

Police say the victims were an 80-year-old woman and an 82-year-old woman in Rutledge’s custody.

A witness told police he saw Rutledge cover the 80-year-old resident’s nose and mouth with his hand after hearing the victim scream. Rutledge told the witness that the elderly woman was screaming too loudly.

Tendency : Hawthorne Middle High School threat under investigation

Another witness said they entered Rutledge pinning the non-verbal 82-year-old woman against a wall. According to the witness, Rutledge was upset that the victim didn’t want to go to bed.

Gwendolyn Zoharah Simmons, who resides in the area, says she knew a resident of a chartered seniors’ residence and is troubled by the abuse allegations.

I had a neighbor who was in that place and I thought it was a good place,” Simmons said. “And I was very happy that he was there near where his wife could just walk and have meals with him. So, I’m terribly upset to hear that.

Rutledge denied physically harming the victims.

The Charter Senior Living facility supervisor said the investigation is still ongoing and has not commented on it.

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Joel Mekler | Medicare Moments: Misconceptions About Using Medicare to Pay for Long-Term Care | Lifestyles https://wendyfoundation.org/joel-mekler-medicare-moments-misconceptions-about-using-medicare-to-pay-for-long-term-care-lifestyles/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 07:30:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/joel-mekler-medicare-moments-misconceptions-about-using-medicare-to-pay-for-long-term-care-lifestyles/ October is nationally recognized as Long Term Care Planning Awareness Month. Do you have a plan in place? The month focuses on a range of opportunities and actions older people and their caregivers can take to better understand and prepare for the potential costs of long-term care services in the future. Unfortunately, this is not […]]]>

October is nationally recognized as Long Term Care Planning Awareness Month. Do you have a plan in place?

The month focuses on a range of opportunities and actions older people and their caregivers can take to better understand and prepare for the potential costs of long-term care services in the future. Unfortunately, this is not something that people expect. Statistics show that most people don’t understand the different forms of long-term care, the different ways to pay for it, and most don’t plan for long-term care until a health care crisis hits. hit them.

In my experience as a Medicare counselor, I regularly talk to seniors who are worried about costs at the end of their life. Several families told me that they were taking out reverse mortgages, spending their savings and dipping into their retirement accounts to pay for long-term care.

WHAT IS LONG TERM CARE?

Long-term care is a range of services and supports that a person may need in the future for personal care. Most long-term care is not medical care but rather assistance with basic daily living tasks, sometimes called activities of daily living (ADL), such as bathing, dressing, going to toilet, transfer and eat. This also includes supervising someone with dementia, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

THE TRUTHS ABOUT LONG-TERM CARE

•Fact: According to LongTermCare.gov, 70% of people over 65 can expect to use some form of long-term care during their lifetime, typically for about three years. This means that there is a good chance that you will need long-term care in the future.

•Fact: By 2050, an estimated 27 million people will need long-term care.

•Fact: One in three people who reach the age of 65 will need nursing home care.

•Fact: Only 35% of Americans report having set aside money to meet their long-term care needs.

•Fact: 78% of seniors who need care receive it from a family member or loved one. Although caregiving may be acceptable for a time, family members usually cannot continue caring for a sick loved one for long. Caring for a sick parent, grandparent or other family member is a significant burden and will put a strain on family members. According to an AP poll of public attitudes about long-term care, 51% of caregivers say the experience has caused stress in their family.

• Fact: The national annual median cost of care ranges from over $108,000 per year for a private room in a nursing home to $20,280 per year for adult day health care services five days a week , according to Genworth Financials 2021 Cost of Care Survey. A semi-private room costs $7,756 per month or $93,075 per year.

•Fact: Medicare and regular health insurance do not cover long-term care. That’s why it’s crucial that you plan for the huge expense of long-term care. While it’s impossible to predict whether or how much you’ll need this care, prevention is far better than cure, especially since Medicare can’t bail you out.

Long-term care is a complex and frightening national issue. It is important to remember that most people have no experience of long-term care until a family member needs care. Then, a family is plunged headlong into a fragmented web of private and public services at a time when immediate and critical care decisions must be made.

Try Googling “am I eligible for Medicaid?” You can spend hours scanning your state’s website or phoning a regional aging agency to determine the difference between Medicaid for nursing homes and home care or if your state has a waiting list for several months for assisted living.

Local resources and services, and the names of each, vary from community to community and challenge searches by family members who do not live in the same community as the person in need of care. Often, only expensive, fee-based options are available to those who are not yet eligible for a dizzying array of public programs once savings and other resources have been exhausted.

It is also important to note that it is the family members, not the person with a disability, who arranges any benefits a person may have and will need to inquire about Medicare, Medicaid, or private insurance. Most are overwhelmed by navigating a maze of arcane terms, definitions, conditions, exclusions and requirements for which they have no knowledge or expertise.

Medicare is a great program. It provides essential health insurance to millions of elderly and disabled people. But, contrary to popular belief, Medicare does not cover long-term care in skilled nursing facilities (often called nursing homes).

At best, Medicare only covers up to 100 days of skilled nursing care per benefit period. To be covered by Medicare, the patient must need and receive daily skilled nursing care and therapy. It is not uncommon for people to be told that they do not meet this standard, even when they do. If someone needs more than 100 days of such care during a benefit period, they will have to pay out of pocket.

In addition, Medicare only covers a stay in an EHPAD if the stay was preceded by hospitalization for at least three consecutive days. This requirement of prior hospitalization is increasingly difficult to satisfy since many hospital stays are now qualified as “ambulatory” observation status, and not hospitalization. This policy further and unfairly limits Medicare benefits for skilled nursing in residential care settings.

If the patient can be cared for at home, Medicare home medical coverage may be available for nursing, therapy, and home health aides as long as the person meets the coverage criteria. These include the general inability to leave home, occasionally or for specific reasons. Medicare won’t pay for custodial care – the help you need to function – if the patient doesn’t need skills.

Many people end up in nursing homes or assisted living facilities not because they are sick or injured, but because their bodies no longer function as they used to and their mobility is limited. That’s where long-term care comes in, and it’s an expense you’ll typically have to meet without Medicare help.

Not only is Medicare not free, but your health care costs in retirement could be much higher than you think due to the number of services that Medicare does not cover. For example, Medicare does not cover dental exams, vision services, and hearing aids. But again, if there’s one major expense not covered by Medicare to watch out for, it’s none other than long-term care.

Conversely, Medicaid will cover the costs of nursing home care or skilled medical care provided at home. However, because Medicaid is a needs-based welfare program, the only way to qualify for benefits is to spend next to nothing (usually around $2,000 in most states).

In addition, the quality of care and the facilities where care is provided are determined by the state and depend on the availability of these resources. So even if you qualify for Medicaid, you may not be guaranteed admission to a nursing home until a bed becomes available. For these reasons, Medicaid should be a last resort when funding long-term care.

Many people mistakenly believe that “other health insurers” will pay for their long-term care. The surprising truth is that long-term care is NOT covered by any other type of insurance, including your HMO, health insurance, or long-term disability insurance. Only long-term care insurance, which you usually purchase yourself, covers day-to-day personal care when you can’t perform daily activities like bathing and dressing.

Make October the month you talk to a certified financial planner or elder law attorney about long-term care. Let them help you better understand how government policies and private programs can work together for better quality care when you or your loved ones are most vulnerable.

Thinking about long-term care may not be fun or exciting, but it can benefit you and your family. Knowing that you have a plan for where and how you want to live as you age can make you feel more secure and confident about your future. A plan will help family members prepare to help you with your care or find your preferred caregiver, and the financial logistics won’t surprise you. It’s your life… Plan it!

(Joel Mekler is a Certified Senior Counselor. Send your Medicare questions to him at mekbab2000@verizon.net.)

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Amid severe nursing shortage, Hawaii’s nursing schools are rejecting hundreds of qualified applicants https://wendyfoundation.org/amid-severe-nursing-shortage-hawaiis-nursing-schools-are-rejecting-hundreds-of-qualified-applicants/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/amid-severe-nursing-shortage-hawaiis-nursing-schools-are-rejecting-hundreds-of-qualified-applicants/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — As Hawaii’s hospitals grapple with a severe nursing shortage, nursing schools across the state are rejecting hundreds of qualified applicants. The reason: There are not enough instructors to teach them. Officials say the number of vacant instructor positions has doubled since 2016. Of the 131 full-time teaching positions in Hawaii’s nursing schools, […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — As Hawaii’s hospitals grapple with a severe nursing shortage, nursing schools across the state are rejecting hundreds of qualified applicants.

The reason: There are not enough instructors to teach them.

Officials say the number of vacant instructor positions has doubled since 2016.

Of the 131 full-time teaching positions in Hawaii’s nursing schools, 24 need to be filled.

At the University of Hawaii at Manoa School of Nursing, freshmen were at the school’s simulation center on Tuesday, to get a taste of what it’s like to be a frontline caregiver.

It’s a career more than 1,500 qualified candidates attempted to pursue at nursing schools in Hawaii last year.

But more than 800 of those prospective students — more than half — never made it to class.

“We can’t admit students because we don’t have the experts who can be professors and instructors in a nursing school,” said Laura Reichhardt, director of the State Center for Nursing.

She said Hawaii’s teacher shortage was one of the worst in the country.

Reichhardt said most instructor positions require at least a master’s degree, preferably a doctorate.

But the starting salary for an instructor is around $80,000. That’s about $25,000 less than what a registered nurse can earn starting work on a hospital floor.

“I think in Hawaii today the challenge may be that our cost of living is so high,” Reichhardt said.

“The economy of maintaining your household is something that makes the stay in the clinic more favorable. Especially on neighboring islands.

In addition to shortages of on-campus instructors, there is also a lack of clinical training sites.

Right now, hospitals, long-term care facilities and community health clinics are so busy that it’s hard for staff to accommodate more people.

“That includes the students in the unit, because it just adds to the number of things they have to pay attention to,” said Clementina Ceria-Ulep, acting dean of the Nancy Atmospera-Walch School of Nursing at the NIHA. UH-Manoa.

Natalie Welch is expected to graduate from the UH program in May.

Amid the severe shortage of nurses, she says she wants to start her career serving the community she grew up in.

“My goal is to work in a Level 1 Trauma Center, Intensive Care Unit at Queen’s Medical Center,” she said. “I worked there as a nursing assistant and I really like the establishment and all the people.”

In an attempt to cultivate more instructors, UH-Manoa now has a nursing education and leadership program for registered nurses who want to pass on their knowledge and wisdom to the next generation.

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Caregiver returns to scene of weekend fire in Enterprise | WDHN https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiver-returns-to-scene-of-weekend-fire-in-enterprise-wdhn/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 04:19:07 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/caregiver-returns-to-scene-of-weekend-fire-in-enterprise-wdhn/ ENTERPRISE, Ala (WDHN) — Earlier this week, we told you about a neighbor who saved the lives of two occupants in an Enterprise home fire. WDHN followed one of these occupants as she returned for the first time since the fire. Last Sunday afternoon, Mary Griffin and her babysitter, Angie Byrd, were at their Bellwood […]]]>

ENTERPRISE, Ala (WDHN) — Earlier this week, we told you about a neighbor who saved the lives of two occupants in an Enterprise home fire. WDHN followed one of these occupants as she returned for the first time since the fire.

Last Sunday afternoon, Mary Griffin and her babysitter, Angie Byrd, were at their Bellwood Road home when their neighbor. Marvin Pickiney shouted to get them out of the house. The garage and the back of the structure were on fire.

With Griffin in a seat helping him maneuver, smoke and flames filled the residence. Pickney ran inside and passed the griffin through a window to neighbors waiting outside. He then helped Byrd out of the house.

“There was a table in the way, I remember they threw it out of the way and lifted it up and put it out the window. It was miraculous if we had stayed longer we would not have made it.” said Byrd “It was divine appointments, it’s just amazing that he was coming home at that time and saw the fire that we wouldn’t have walked through if not for that man, c is a true hero.”

As Byrd returns home several days after the fire, she realizes how lucky she and Miss Mary are.

On Friday, Mary joined her husband, Chick Griffin, at an Enterprise assisted living facility. Byrd says she currently lives with her mother after losing her home to last weekend’s fire.

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GPS ID bracelets help Michiganders with dementia find their way home https://wendyfoundation.org/gps-id-bracelets-help-michiganders-with-dementia-find-their-way-home/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 04:02:23 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/gps-id-bracelets-help-michiganders-with-dementia-find-their-way-home/ This article is part of Health, a series about how Michigan communities are stepping up to address health challenges. It is made possible thanks to funding from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund. A new collaboration in Calhoun County has helped 135 missing people with dementia return home safely – and made life easier for their […]]]>
This article is part of Health, a series about how Michigan communities are stepping up to address health challenges. It is made possible thanks to funding from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund.

A new collaboration in Calhoun County has helped 135 missing people with dementia return home safely – and made life easier for their caregivers, local law enforcement and healthcare providers.

The Help Home Personal Identification Program* provides county residents and their caregivers with comfortable, waterproof GPS ID wristbands that provide location, emergency contacts, and medical information. When a person wanders off, they can be located. And, when a wandering person is found, first responders can scan the bracelet’s QR code or call the 800 number on their back to put them in touch with loved ones immediately.

The program is organized by Miles for memories, a Calhoun County-based organization that serves people with dementia. Other collaborators include the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Officethe Michigan State Policethe Michigan Sheriffs Association, Emerging Health Partnersthe Regional Agencies Association of Michigan, University of Michigan, Wayne State Universityand other local actors.

“When Miles for Memories was born, we had a group of people from the community who all had a role to play in caring for someone with dementia,” says Sherii Joy Sherban, President of the Leadership Team from Miles for Memories. “We were trying to figure out how to do a search and rescue or a return of a person with dementia who got lost.”

When representatives from local 911 dispatch, ambulance services, healthcare and law enforcement joined the discussion, the benefits of transforming the management of missing persons cases involving patients with dementia have become clear.

“The brainstorming that happened when all of these groups came together spawned some stimulating conversations,” says Sherban. “We really looked at what we needed and when we went to look at what was available in the community, there was nothing, so we started looking at existing technologies.”

What they found was a personal identification bracelet that offered both GPS tracking and information retrieval capabilities. A grant from the Michigan Health Endowment Fund is helping to make the bracelets available to area residents for a one-time fee of $25. The Battle Creek Community Foundation wrote and administered the grant for the program.
A bracelet from the Help Home Personal ID program*.
“We do a lot of work in the area of ​​health and independent living for seniors. Many of our donors and people we know have suffered from different types of dementia,” says Annette Chapman, senior vice president of Battle Creek. Community Foundation. “We thought we could improve the lives of dementia patients and their caregivers and families by giving them a sense of security with these wristbands.”

The program has already distributed 1,500 bracelets to residents of Calhoun County and surrounding areas and helped 135 people return home safely. Sherban describes an example in which an elderly man with dementia presented to the hospital.

“[Hospital staff] were able to scan his wristband and communicate directly with his emergency contact,” she says. “They knew who he was, where he lived, who the emergency contact was, found out what medications he was on and spoke to his doctors to make decisions. Eventually, a relative was able to pick him up and bring him home.”

Sherban notes that 7% of those who wear bracelets are carers for loved ones living with dementia. These caregivers feel more comfortable knowing that if something renders them incapacitated, first responders will know how to provide the necessary care for their loved one with dementia.

“It’s not a group of people that we originally thought of,” Sherban says. “But our very first person to receive a bracelet was a carer who had a heart attack and ended up in hospital. He was in hospital for several days before he was alert, conscious and able to ask, ‘Where is my wife and who is taking care of her?'”

“Significant savings”

Through conversations with project collaborators, Miles for Memory staff calculated the cost savings resulting from the implementation of the wristbands. They estimated that without bracelets, search and rescue costs range from $11,000 to over $17,000 per person. A person identified by their bracelet can be reunited with their loved one rather than taking an expensive ambulance ride to the hospital and racking up emergency costs for testing, as the bracelet provides access to medical history. Sherban says conservative estimates of those costs are $5,000. Doing the math, the 135 residents who were located and reunited with loved ones using the bracelets saved $675,000 in ambulance and hospital costs alone.

“We may have saved search and rescue costs at the same time, so obviously that amount could be even higher,” Sherban said.

For Calhoun County Sheriff Steve Hinkley, giving the wristbands to residents was both a personal and professional decision.

“Throughout my life, especially towards the end of her life, my mother suffered quite extensively from dementia,” says Hinkley. “I also realized how much of an impact this could have on our law enforcement community as we respond to missing persons walking away from nursing homes and other facilities throughout the county.”

Hinkley notes that previously, when a person with dementia was found wandering, law enforcement was faced with the hours-long task of bringing them back to the police station, making a positive identification and locating a relative. or a facility representative to take her home. With wristbands, officers can immediately access the person’s information and contact their emergency contacts.

“In many cases, they may not remember exactly who they are. They don’t know where they live,” Hinkley says. “Imagine spending five, six hours – getting that individual back to the police department, sitting him down, feeding him. And imagine the time it takes to try to figure out who that person is and where they’re missing from just in scanning that code and immediately knowing where they come from, who the loved one is, and then doing that reunification instantly, that will definitely save a lot of labor costs, big savings.

Hinkley estimates that Calhoun County has between five and 10 dementia-related cases each year. Since the state does not track data in any specific category, no specific numbers are available.

“We’ve had some success with tracking dogs. We’ve had some success with community members spotting people walking in unusual places and found that person to be missing and in need. And then, over the years, we’ve had a few We’ve had missing persons who have died. Those are real sad situations,” Hinkley says. “Hopefully that helps prevent some of them.”

The Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office has trained five support staff to work on Personal Identification Program resource sites* in its Battle Creek and Marshall regional offices, where county residents can register in the program. Hinkley hopes to start promoting the program this month.

“Our staff will be able to help you connect to any equipment you need,” Hinkley said. “They will also help you create a profile and set everything up for you and your loved one to be successful. You can come and sit directly with them and they will help you get started on the program.”

More Michigan agencies replicating the program

Miles for Memories is also leveraging Michigan Health Endowment Fund grants to host free workshops where other Michigan-area agencies on aging, law enforcement, and social service agencies can learn how to replicate the program. in their communities.
The latest training on the Help Home Personal ID* program.
Those interested in attending a November 2022 training session can contact Sherban for details at (269) 979-1412 or milesformemories@milesformemories.org. To date, nearly 100 people representing 50 Michigan counties have completed the training.

“It’s just a phenomenal program that we all need to take a serious look at,” Hinkley said. “It’s so valuable. It makes sense on every level. And it’s so simple. It’s amazing based on the value and the results that can be achieved.”

Estelle Slootmaker is a writer specializing in journalism, book publishing, communications, poetry and children’s books. You can contact her at Estelle.Slootmaker@gmail.com or www.constellations.biz.

Photos courtesy of Miles for Memories.

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