Child adoption – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 03:42:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wendyfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Child adoption – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ 32 32 Omaha Nonprofit Sponsors Adopt-A-Student Program https://wendyfoundation.org/omaha-nonprofit-sponsors-adopt-a-student-program/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 00:44:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/omaha-nonprofit-sponsors-adopt-a-student-program/ ELKHORN, Neb. (WOWT) – The back-to-school frenzy begins now, and we’re reminded that not all parents are able to provide new clothes and school supplies for their children. Isaac, 12, and Nova Vlasak, 11, are the first to drop off a backpack full of school essentials at open house mission Tuesday. They are part of […]]]>

ELKHORN, Neb. (WOWT) – The back-to-school frenzy begins now, and we’re reminded that not all parents are able to provide new clothes and school supplies for their children.

Isaac, 12, and Nova Vlasak, 11, are the first to drop off a backpack full of school essentials at open house mission Tuesday.

They are part of the Adopt-A-Student program where they sponsor a homeless child and get a list of items the child wants.

“On the list it said he wanted poppets, so we put a few in there. It’s just good to help others,” said Isaac Vlasak.

“Most of the time we shopped online, but yeah, because you can just find a bunch of stuff,” Nova Vlasak said.

Adopt-A-Student is looking for 90 volunteers to purchase a new backpack, clothes, shoes and school supplies for a child in need. So far, the mission has responded to 60 of these requests.

“We do this so that the children have things like everyone else and that they don’t stand out in their class, that they feel appreciated and loved. It’s just really important that all the things we do try to help students not be more negatively affected than they will be because of their parents’ homelessness,” said Steve Frazee, Open Door Assignment.

Steve Frazee says the average homeless person in the metro area is nine years old. He says a child can be six to 18 months behind when the family becomes homeless.

Susan Christensen adopts a student each year. She says this program is important for homeless children.

“Critical, they need all the help and we’re all human beings so we all need whatever help we can get, and honestly, I’m doing way better than him. Yeah, that’s was fun to shop for back to school because my daughter is growing up,” Christensen said.

Returning to school can be difficult for children, especially those who are homeless.

“I think that’s really important, especially in Elkhorn where people are mostly on the wealthier side, so we don’t really have homelessness here and it’s nice to get another perspective and everything. the world doesn’t have what you have,” Makenna said. Dilwok.

These teens are ending the summer by volunteering at the Open Door Mission outlet in Elkhorn. They understand the importance of optics for children.

“No matter how much someone can put up a wall and say ‘oh, I don’t care what people think’, everybody kinda cares what people think, you know, so I just think and I can just sponsor a kid is a good thing, but yeah, everybody wants to fit in. You know, high school,” said high school junior Kate Heingen.

“When they don’t meet, they feel out of place and that leads to kids dropping out or not doing as well as they should.”

The hope is that these backpacks and especially their contents will help children who already have every chance of succeeding.

And even though donor and child never meet face to face, there is a shared affection.

“Here’s a thank you, the kids painted these pictures to say thank you for the backpacks. It’s beautiful.”

The open door mission needs school supplies and clothing all year round.

Copyright 2022 WOWT. All rights reserved.

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Reviews | Your pandemic pup wasn’t a mistake https://wendyfoundation.org/reviews-your-pandemic-pup-wasnt-a-mistake/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 09:00:11 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/reviews-your-pandemic-pup-wasnt-a-mistake/ Now there is a new series of stories of places like Chicago and New York– and even Portland, Maine — where the housing crisis has hit particularly hard. When there aren’t enough places to live, finding a pet-friendly apartment is even harder. And when prices skyrocket, people already living on the edge may not be […]]]>

Now there is a new series of stories of places like Chicago and New York– and even Portland, Maine — where the housing crisis has hit particularly hard. When there aren’t enough places to live, finding a pet-friendly apartment is even harder. And when prices skyrocket, people already living on the edge may not be able to afford the cost of a pet. It’s no wonder that shelter managers are facing a new round of animal abandonment: In a New York City pet shelter system, redemptions increased by nearly 25% compared to last year.

Opinion talk
What will work and life look like after the pandemic?

But it’s important to consider these numbers in the context of a mind-boggling economy of scale. The number of pet adoptions and abandonments fluctuates all the time, and for many reasons. Millions of pets have ended up in shelters every year before the pandemic, and millions more will end up in shelters even after the economy recovers.

It’s true that a family’s situation can change, sometimes tragically, but it’s also true that too many people bring home a pet with no idea what responsible pet ownership entails. . Too many others see animals not as members of the family, but as disposable lifestyle accessories – Vox even included dogs in an article on Pandemic impulse buys that people now regret. This is why adopting from a rescue organization often involves an arduous application process: the hope is that careful matching of people and pets will limit traumatic abandonment.

Even with ample resources, living with an animal of another species has never been without problems. Our family dogs chewed on our shoes and furniture, peed on our carpets, barked furiously at the people we love, threw them in our cars, and ate all kinds of things that would have killed them if we hadn’t taken them to the vet. on time. They dug trenches in our yard, galloped through our house with the irreplaceable love of a child clenched between their teeth, left muddy paw prints on our white sheets. For decades, we’ve walked the world with dog hair on every black pair of pants we own.

Everything is worth it.

I’m not even talking about well-studied health benefits, even if the health benefits are extravagant. A beloved dog will lower a person’s blood pressure, reduce stress hormones, calm anxiety and even make it easier to interact with other human beings. You may think this rambunctious, voracious, apartment-destroying pup will be your death, but adopting a dog actually lowers your risk of death. And that’s because dogs will love you until the day they die.

After our Millie died last year, it took months before I felt ready to look for another dog, and by then I had learned that I needed major surgery. . The unexpected health setback didn’t dismay me as much as the need to call off the search for our next family member.

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More countries agree to use Children First software to help end the institutionalization of their children https://wendyfoundation.org/more-countries-agree-to-use-children-first-software-to-help-end-the-institutionalization-of-their-children/ Thu, 04 Aug 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/more-countries-agree-to-use-children-first-software-to-help-end-the-institutionalization-of-their-children/ PR Newswire PLANO, Texas, August 4, 2022 BEB experiences rapid growth in the first half of 2022 with its software used in 8 countries PLANO, TX, August 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — TexasTechnology-based nonprofit Both Ends Believing expands in 2022 as four new countries now partner to use Children First Software. BEB offers its software platform […]]]>

PR Newswire

PLANO, Texas, August 4, 2022

BEB experiences rapid growth in the first half of 2022 with its software used in 8 countries

PLANO, TX, August 4, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — TexasTechnology-based nonprofit Both Ends Believing expands in 2022 as four new countries now partner to use Children First Software. BEB offers its software platform free of charge to governments and puts a team of experts on the ground to facilitate implementation and training on the software. CFS’s goal is to equip governments to create digital files for all their institutionalized children and transfer them to families. To date, more than 30,000 children have profiles in the system, which represents a growth of 273% in three years.

BEB: Children first. Family forever. (PRNewsfoto/Both Ends Believe)

CFS, developed by BEB and Tyler Technologies, is a cloud-based application that contains six modules that help countries and their child protection officers to: 1) register a child; 2) develop a plan to relocate the child to his family; 3) seek the best foster care for the child – reunification, kinship care, foster care, or national or international adoption; 4) qualify families ready to adopt; 5) matching and placing the child in a family when biological reunification is not in the best interests of the child; and 6) track and monitor the placement.

As 2022 dawns, CFS has been used by governments in Uganda, Honduras, Guatemalaand the Dominican Republic. Since, Ecuador, Paraguay, Nuevo Leon, Mexicoand the DEBO Alliance for children in Ethiopia have signed MoUs with BEB and are currently implementing CFS.

BEB President, Mark Schwartzshares, “Countries currently using CFS and creating digital identities for children in their care are reporting a transformational shift in their ability to execute individual plans and safely move every child into a family. As these countries are sharing their success with their peers in their regions, we are now seeing a rapid acceleration in the number of countries using CSA and we expect this trend to continue for the foreseeable future.”

Leticia OcamposDirector of Human Rights of the Ministry of Children and Adolescence of Paraguay shares, “The (CFS) system is extremely important to us, as it helps to prevent the child from being seen as another brick in the wall and guarantees their rights through our national protection system. Thanks to the CFS, we can see every child’s access to education, recreation and a life plan, and through BEB we can enable every child to live in a family.”

As CFS expands to new countries, thousands more children will experience the love of family. These governments along with BEB are working diligently to ensure that this dream becomes a reality.

About BEB

BEB was founded in January 2010 as a 501(c)(3) organization to promote systemic change for vulnerable children. BEB strives to capture comprehensive digital profiles of children through Children First Software (CFS), a technology-driven advocate designed to identify a child’s best opportunity for family care. In partnership with countries around the world, we are transforming the process to bring children to their best future, a chance to grow and thrive in a loving family.

Margaret Elizabeth McKissack
Vice President, External Affairs
BABY
margaretelizabeth@bebglobal.org
214-850-7532

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SOURCE Believing in both ends

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Hillsborough County – Find a study buddy before you go back to school https://wendyfoundation.org/hillsborough-county-find-a-study-buddy-before-you-go-back-to-school/ Tue, 02 Aug 2022 19:21:31 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/hillsborough-county-find-a-study-buddy-before-you-go-back-to-school/ Job August 2, 2022 | 2:35 p.m. Adoption fees waived for Pet Resource Center pets at its August back-to-school event Find a study buddy before you go back to school by adopting a pet from Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center (PRC). The special adoption event will take place at the CRP this Saturday, August […]]]>


Job August 2, 2022 | 2:35 p.m.

Adoption fees waived for Pet Resource Center pets at its August back-to-school event

Find a study buddy before you go back to school by adopting a pet from Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center (PRC). The special adoption event will take place at the CRP this Saturday, August 6 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., just in time to find a sweet buddy to help your family enjoy the school year. All adoption fees are waived and all PRC pets are neutered or neutered, microchipped and vaccinated.
According FamilyEducation.comReading aloud to pets has many benefits, no matter what reading level the child has reached.
• Animals do not judge a child’s reading skills, which can encourage hesitant or struggling readers to practice and gain confidence.
• Reading aloud to animals helps improve literacy skills and has a positive effect on attitudes towards reading in young learners.
• Animals also benefit from story time. It can help fussy dogs and cats develop social skills if they need extra attention for anxiety.

The back-to-school adoption event takes place during the summer, traditionally a time when pet populations skyrocket at shelters across the country. PRC is currently largely over capacity.
Hundreds of adoptable cats and dogs can be seen online at HCFLGov.net/Adopt but all adoptions must be done in person at the center at 440 N. Falkenburg Road. Tampa, Florida 33619.
Follow PRC on Facebook to get your daily dose of PRC animals!

Are you adopting and want to know the next steps? Check out these helpful tips:

How to Introduce Your New Cat to Their New Home
How to Introduce Your New Dog to His New Home
New pet guide
Be Your Pet’s Best Friend: Prepare an Emergency Plan
Paw-tastic ways to spoil your pets
9 ways to protect your pets this summer

Photo Info: Hillsborough County Pet Resource Center volunteers read and comfort PRC pets.

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Bishops advance Lambeth appeal by adopting guidelines to prevent abuse – Episcopal News Service https://wendyfoundation.org/bishops-advance-lambeth-appeal-by-adopting-guidelines-to-prevent-abuse-episcopal-news-service/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 19:09:32 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/bishops-advance-lambeth-appeal-by-adopting-guidelines-to-prevent-abuse-episcopal-news-service/ Bishops listen to the plenary session on Safe Church during the Lambeth Conference on July 31, 2022. Photo: Neil Turner/The Lambeth Conference [Episcopal News Service – Canterbury, England] During the second plenary session of the Lambeth Conference, primates, bishops and other church leaders spoke about how to prevent and heal abuse in the church, and […]]]>

Bishops listen to the plenary session on Safe Church during the Lambeth Conference on July 31, 2022. Photo: Neil Turner/The Lambeth Conference

[Episcopal News Service – Canterbury, England] During the second plenary session of the Lambeth Conference, primates, bishops and other church leaders spoke about how to prevent and heal abuse in the church, and create a common culture of safety in across the variety of cultural contexts that make up the Anglican Communion.

After hearing from Safe Church trustees, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby and a victim of clergy sexual abuse, the Bishops looked at Lambeth’s Call on Safe Church project, which commits provinces to a plan to prevent and fight against abuse. Agreeing that the specifics can be adapted to each province or diocese but that the principles must be shared, the bishops approved the draft appeal to move to its final phase, when it will be revised to include the comments they provided. .

In plenary, Welby said the problem of abuse in the church “has been the heaviest and most powerful burden of this role that I have faced in the past 10 years”.

Abuse, he said, is not limited to any region, culture or context – although “it is largely a male problem”.

“The fundamental problem of Safe Church is the abuse of power. It’s not even, normally, particularly a question of sex. It’s about power – someone’s ability to do whatever they want with someone who is weaker,” he said.

Garth Blake, chairman of the Anglican Communion Safe Church Commission, gave an overview of the progressive steps the Communion has taken to prevent abuse in all its forms – including sexual, emotional and spiritual abuse – in churches. At the 2008 Lambeth Conference, “the abuse of power within society and the Church and its disproportionate impact on women and children” emerged as a theme which generated guidelines and recommendations over the next decade.

In 2012, the Anglican Consultative Council adopted the Charter for Life Safety in the Churches of the Anglican Communion, encouraging all provinces to fulfill its five commitments: to provide pastoral support where there are abuses; respond effectively to abuse; methods of teaching safe pastoral ministry through education and training; assess the suitability of potential church leaders through background checks and other methods; and promoting a culture of security to prevent abuse.

This charter is the basis for the ACC’s establishment of the Safe Church Commission in 2016. The ACC has approved a protocol for provinces to share information about the suitability of potential ordinands or lay leaders for ministry. The protocol suggests a framework for provinces to report cases of proven abuse or credible allegations, so that potentially abusive clergy or lay leaders cannot continue their ministry in another province.

The ACC adopted a another set of guidelines in 2019, developed by the Safe Church Commission, for churches to improve the safety of children and vulnerable adults in the communion provinces. The ACC asked each province to adopt and implement the charter, protocol and guidelines at the 2019 meeting.

The Call for a Safe Church project would affirm that provinces commit to all of these measures, implementing them in a way that suits their local context.

Bishop Tim Thornton, chairman of the Lambeth Appeals Subgroup, told an evening press conference that the bishops had “unanimously agreed to the appeal”, although the process they use to record their approval or disapproval has changed. For the July 30 first call, the bishops used electronic voting devices to submit one of three possible responses to the call to mission and evangelism.

However, Thornton said, based on the bishops’ comments, the conference will no longer use the devices. Instead, bishops will discuss drafts in small groups, of which up to six will be randomly selected to verbally present their thoughts during the session. Then it will be put to a voice vote, and if there is a clear consensus that the appeal should go forward, it will move on to a final draft incorporating all of the Bishops’ comments.

Thornton clarified that there will be no numerical counting of votes. When asked what would happen if there was no clear consensus, Thornton quoted Welby as saying that “if the majority says no, indeed, then the appeal will not proceed, and the work will be graded, but it won’t go to the next phase.

The guidelines and protocols affirmed by the Safe Church appeal do not prescribe specific actions or rules, and that is by design, said Blake, chair of the Safe Church Commission.

“Why “guidelines”? Because of 165 countries and all these different legal systems, we can’t have one set of prescriptive rules. But we may have guidelines that need to be adapted to each province, and we have tested the suitability of these guidelines through a wide range of commission members in all regions of the world. And part of my role as chair was to say, “This draft guideline, does it work in your province?”

Bishop Cleophas Lunga of Zimbabwe’s Matabeleland Diocese, part of the Church of Central Africa Province, said it was essential to be able to implement the guidelines in a locally relevant way, partly because the legal and procedural systems in Zimbabwe are often not interrelated. easily with those from other parts of the world.

“We are now, as a province of Central Africa – and I am sure that other provinces in Africa will follow us – to start using the guidelines that we have managed to put in place, so that they can be adapted to our context, and include the pieces we have [already been] use, to make the set of safeguards comprehensive,” he said. “So it’s a welcome idea.”

– Egan Millard is associate editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be contacted at emillard@episcopalchurch.org.

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King Edward Memorial Hospital drops ‘offensive’ forced adoption apology amid fight for redress https://wendyfoundation.org/king-edward-memorial-hospital-drops-offensive-forced-adoption-apology-amid-fight-for-redress/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 19:15:50 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/king-edward-memorial-hospital-drops-offensive-forced-adoption-apology-amid-fight-for-redress/ Holding up the adoption certificate she reluctantly signed as a mother of 15, Lisa Moore is still struggling to contain her outrage at the events of 40 years ago. Key points: The hospital removed the apology from its website Survivors of forced adoption say their concerns are not being heard Opposition WA backs calls for […]]]>

Holding up the adoption certificate she reluctantly signed as a mother of 15, Lisa Moore is still struggling to contain her outrage at the events of 40 years ago.

She chokes and wipes away tears as she recounts what happened after she fell pregnant by her 18-year-old boyfriend while growing up in suburban Perth in 1981.

Even though her parents offered to look after the baby, Ms Moore says the family were manipulated and lied to by social workers who were determined to adopt her unborn child.

“You’re told you can’t give them anything and the adoptive parents can give them everything, so you feel like a loser in a way,” she says.

“I was told that if I loved him, I would give him up.”

Baby snatch

After birth at King Edward Memorial Hospital in Perth, Ms Moore said her son was taken away before she could hold him.

“He was born and the nurse went to give him to me and the doctor said ‘no, you can’t do that, he’s up for adoption’,” she said.

The next day, she was given a birth registration document to sign that already had a boy’s name on it.

Lisa Moore was just 15 when she was forced to give up her baby for adoption in 1981.(Provided: Lisa Moore)

“They said the nurses named it after one of the doctors there,” she says.

“I couldn’t name him. Even that right was taken away from me.”

When her parents visited her in hospital and tried to see the baby, Ms Moore says they were escorted away by security.

And when she tried to see her newborn, she was taken back to her room and told that if she didn’t calm down, she would be sedated.

Little action since the apology

Ms Moore’s horrific story helped spark a public apology from Western Australia’s parliament in 2010 to women forced to give up their babies.

But 12 years later, Ms Moore – like many survivors of the forced adoption era – is still plagued with unanswered questions and broken promises.

Gillard apologizes for forced adoptions
In 2013, then Prime Minister Julia Gillard issued a historic apology to those affected by past forced adoption practices.(PA: Alan Porritt)

Despite WA’s apology and subsequent federal apology, as well as a Senate investigation, survivors say little has been done since to address the toll of mothers and adoptees (the children, now adults, who were adopted).

Ms Moore is backing calls for Western Australia to track Victoria and carry out a new investigation.

This week, adoptees pushing for a WA investigation won a small but significant victory.

A stork motif above the entrance to the King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women.
King Edward Memorial Hospital has removed the apology from its website.(720 ABC Perth: Emma Wynne )

After speaking to the ABC, the group secured key concessions from King Edward Memorial Hospital.

On Wednesday, the hospital agreed to remove a controversial “formal apology” from its website that angered survivors when it was posted in May.

They called it ‘untruthful’, ‘offensive’ and potentially triggering for mothers and adoptees because it didn’t really apologize for what the hospital had done, instead referring readers to the apologies of the State and national.

women standing in a group on the steps of parliament WA
Mothers from the ARMS WA support group say little has been done to support them since the state’s 2010 apology.(ABC News: Claire Moodie)

They said the so-called apology violated the Senate report’s recommendations that “formal apologies should always be accompanied by commitments to take concrete action that provides appropriate redress for past wrongs.”

Women and Newborn Health Service acting executive director Diane Barr told the ABC that she met with a member of the affected community to hear their concerns and reiterated her commitment to partner with the community to ” improve the statement of apologies”.

Access to medical records sought

Adoptee Jen McRae said the hospital was also committed to investigating how survivors could be better helped to obtain their medical records, a long-time bone of contention for those trying to piece together the missing pieces of their life.

Lisa Moore tried in 2008 to get her hands on her medical records but was told they had been misplaced.

Jen McRae standing in front of the hospital entrance
Jen McRae says there are many unanswered questions regarding forced adoptions in WA.(ABC News: Claire Moodie)

“I think I’m entitled to these records,” she says.

“I think maybe we should be more careful with the adoption records. This ‘can’t find them but that was the time then’ – sorry, that’s just not enough Well.

“I will never get back what was taken from me.”

Lasting trauma

Mrs Moore had to wait 26 years before finally meeting her son.

Although he lives in the UK, they now have a good relationship, albeit at a distance.

But she had to pay for specialist counseling to deal with the complex trauma mothers and adoptees often face.

“You go through life thinking you’re a bad person because good people don’t give up on babies,” she says.

Jen and Lynn sitting together looking at the camera
Jen McRae is working with Lynne Devine of ARMS WA to push for a WA investigation into forced adoptions.(ABC News: Claire Moodie)

According to the ARMS WA group, a support group for mothers separated from their children through adoption, free specialist counseling for all survivors of forced adoption should be made available.

In a statement, the Communities Department said a forced adoption support service run by Relationships WA offered “guidance and information services including support and counseling for anyone affected by adoption. forced”.

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Amid Indiana abortion bill, lawmakers aim to help women and children https://wendyfoundation.org/amid-indiana-abortion-bill-lawmakers-aim-to-help-women-and-children/ Wed, 27 Jul 2022 17:38:29 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/amid-indiana-abortion-bill-lawmakers-aim-to-help-women-and-children/ While Senate Republicans are trying to ban abortion in most cases, lawmakers are trying to increase funding for women and children. Three bills, a companion abortion restrictions bill and two inflation-fighting bills from the Indiana House and Senate advanced on Tuesday, all offering some form of stimulus or of financing. The Senate abortion bill, a […]]]>

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Governor candidate Doden wants free adoptions in Indiana https://wendyfoundation.org/governor-candidate-doden-wants-free-adoptions-in-indiana/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 02:19:58 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/governor-candidate-doden-wants-free-adoptions-in-indiana/ FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – Eric Doden says he first came up with a zero-cost adoption plan a year ago. Now, as Indiana lawmakers consider abortion restrictions, Doden said Monday the need for her plan is even greater. “I hope the legislature will adopt this important policy in the special session,” he said. Doden’s plan […]]]>

FORT WAYNE, Ind. (WANE) – Eric Doden says he first came up with a zero-cost adoption plan a year ago.

Now, as Indiana lawmakers consider abortion restrictions, Doden said Monday the need for her plan is even greater.

“I hope the legislature will adopt this important policy in the special session,” he said.

Doden’s plan would set aside $100 million to establish the state’s Adoption Fund to ensure that “choosing life” is a financially free decision for adoptive mothers and families. The plan would also use tax credits for those who adopt and to encourage donations to the fund.

Doden found support from state Rep. Tim Wesco, R-Osceola, who heard Doden speak on the matter the same day Roe v Wade was overturned by the Supreme Court.

Wesco would consider using the money to help pregnant women choose adoption.

Wesco said some adoption agencies may charge $10,000 up front just to start the adoption process with no guarantee that a child will ever become available.

Wesco said he received “near unanimous support” from his fellow GOP state representatives.

The Indiana Senate included $45 million in its abortion bill to create a new Hoosier Families First Fund.

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War complicates Virginia family’s efforts to adopt Ukrainian girl https://wendyfoundation.org/war-complicates-virginia-familys-efforts-to-adopt-ukrainian-girl/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 11:42:37 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/war-complicates-virginia-familys-efforts-to-adopt-ukrainian-girl/ Comment this story Comment Shortly after meeting the energetic, dark-haired, blue-eyed 9-year-old Ukrainian, Jenny Bradshaw, her husband and their 17-year-old twin daughters were smitten. They had thought about and researched the possibility of adopting an orphan from abroad and realized after a month-long exchange program in December with Katya at their home in Centerville, Virginia, […]]]>

Comment

Shortly after meeting the energetic, dark-haired, blue-eyed 9-year-old Ukrainian, Jenny Bradshaw, her husband and their 17-year-old twin daughters were smitten.

They had thought about and researched the possibility of adopting an orphan from abroad and realized after a month-long exchange program in December with Katya at their home in Centerville, Virginia, that now was the right time. She fits in well with their family.

Katya – whose full name is not used for security reasons – enjoyed helping fill the dishwasher, boil eggs, bake cookies and play dress up. She had fun going to parks and museums and helping feed the family dogs. The family took her to a semi-private Russian ballet class while she was there and Bradshaw said she “loved it”.

But since the Russian invasion of Ukraine this year, the family’s efforts to adopt him have stalled.

More than 200 adoptions are completed each year from Ukraine to the United States, according to State Department statistics. But those stopped because of the war, say adoption experts and State Department officials.

Now Bradshaw and her husband, Holt, are part of a group of expectant parents in the United States who are lobbying Ukrainian adoption authorities, State Department officials and congressional leaders to try to raise awareness of their fate. And while the families wait for normal adoptions to resume, they want the dozens of Ukrainian orphans like Katya who have already been on exchange programs in the United States to come and stay with them for a few months.

“We’re not asking for a special exception or bypassing the full adoption process,” Bradshaw said. “We just want to give him a break and respite from the war.”

Becky and Terry Shinault, who live near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, said they hope to do the same and give another young Ukrainian orphan a few months in their home and away from the war zone.

They took in the teenager, whom they call K and whose full name is not used for security reasons, twice last year for brief stays as part of an exchange program, and later decided they wanted to adopt him.

Exchange programs are designed to give children a taste of American life and a break from their respective orphanages. They don’t encourage or discourage adoption, but simply allow Ukrainian children and their American families to learn about other cultures, according to the families and American officials who run them.

Shinault recalled how fun it was to see K, who recently turned 14, is learning to swim, speaks English and loves dogs and the family horse.

“She loved being an only child and getting all the attention and getting a break from all the other kids,” Becky Shinault said. They had planned to welcome her back this summer as part of the exchange program, but war broke out.

For now, the Shinaults are desperate to get K out of Ukraine. even temporarily. K lived in an orphanage in Mykolaiv, near the Black Sea, and was evacuated on the first day of the war to another facility in western Ukraine, according to Becky Shinault. She said she was sometimes able to talk to K in online message chats, use Google Translate to communicate, but internet and electricity are often spotted.

“She wrote to us recently and said she misses us ‘a lot and wants to come to us,'” Becky said. “But she said, ‘This war doesn’t allow me to fly to you.’ ”

Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-Va.), one of the Capitol Hill leaders who met with the families in DC, said in a statement that she applauds “the efforts of these families who are trying to protect and provide for the needs of Ukrainian orphans”. She added that “I hope conditions will improve very soon so that international adoptions can resume.”

State Department officials said in a June letter to Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.) that they had been in contact with the Ukrainian Ministry of Social Policy and the Ukrainian Embassy in DC

David Bonine, a senior official with the State Department’s Office of Legislative Affairs, wrote in the letter that his department “has made it known that many American families wish to continue the adoption process and temporarily house children in the United States. “.

But he said “the Ukrainian government has made it clear that adoption is not possible at this time and does not allow children to participate in foster programs in the United States.”

Attempts to contact adoption and orphanage officials in Ukraine and Romania were unsuccessful.

Experts have said that it is not uncommon for adoptions or exchange programs to stop during and immediately after natural disasters, wars or other emergencies, because there is such a high risk that parents or other relatives come forward once the situation has calmed down. There is also a high risk of children falling into human trafficking circles.

Kelly Dempsey, a Charlotte attorney who has done international adoptions for 15 years, said there are at least 40 families in the United States who are in similar situations and want to provide respite care for orphans they they had previously met through exchange programs. She said the families had already passed the necessary background checks, home visits and other approvals when they served as foster families for Ukrainian orphans, and that many of them were in the middle. of the adoption process when the war started.

“We disagree that these children should be separated from American families they know,” said Dempsey, whose clients live across the United States and try to help Ukrainian children aged from 6 to 17 years old.

“The short-term solution is to allow children to come on temporary visas to the United States and only return when it’s safe, and then resume the adoption process,” Dempsey said.

“If we can get them out of bomb shelters, refugee camps and other dangerous situations and put them into the homes of families they know and love them, that’s definitely better.”

For now, Katya – along with the other orphans at her facility – has been transferred to an orphanage in a rural town in Romania. Bradshaw went to visit her that spring and let her know, she said, that “her American family has not forgotten her.” She said Katya showed her how she learned to use roller skates.

“We hugged,” Bradshaw said, “and she clung to me.”

Razzan Nakhlawi contributed to this report.

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Reviews | The Pro-Life Movement Must Move Carefully Through Purple States https://wendyfoundation.org/reviews-the-pro-life-movement-must-move-carefully-through-purple-states/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 11:04:40 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/reviews-the-pro-life-movement-must-move-carefully-through-purple-states/ Comment this story Comment The New York Times blames Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (right) for not doing more to restrict abortion since the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade. “Culture Warrior Shuts Up: DeSantis Avoids Questions About Abortion Plans” headline yelled. “While other Republican leaders have pledged to move forward with new restrictions — or […]]]>

Comment

The New York Times blames Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (right) for not doing more to restrict abortion since the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade. “Culture Warrior Shuts Up: DeSantis Avoids Questions About Abortion Plans” headline yelled. “While other Republican leaders have pledged to move forward with new restrictions — or near-total bans,” the article said, “DeSantis offered only a vague promise to ‘work to expand pro-life protections.”

It doesn’t matter, apparently, that DeSantis signed into law a state ban on most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy — similar to Mississippi law, Supreme Court confirmed in June. DeSantis is in a political bind, the story suggests, because “some on the right currently view a 15-week ban as insufficient,” but further restricting abortion could jeopardize his re-election campaign and presidential aspirations.

This is absurd. Florida’s 15-week ban — which DeSantis signed two months before the Supreme Court declared those laws constitutional — saves unborn lives. Left-wing activists continued in state court, accusing the law of violating the right to privacy in Florida’s constitution. DeSantis is fighting to enforce it, and the outcome of this legal battle will determine what other protections for unborn life are possible. In a swing state like Florida, it does more than enough.

Marc Thiessen: For the Fall of Roe c. Wade, thank you Donald Trump

When the pro-life movement fought to overthrow roe deer, and defer abortion policy decisions to the states, most recognized that the result would be different sets of restrictions. In deep-red states with large pro-life majorities, leaders would enact more restrictive laws. And in dark blue states, abortion would unfortunately continue to be permitted with few limits. But in purple states — where public opinion is divided — pro-life leaders must tread carefully and ensure that the laws they propose reflect political reality.

In Virginia, for example, Governor Glenn Youngkin (right) announced he would seek to ban most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. In a state that last year elected its first Republican governor since 2009, that makes sense. A recent Harvard-Harris poll found that 72% of Americans – including 60% of Democrats – want to limit abortion to 15 weeks of pregnancy or earlier, or allow it only in cases of rape and incest. Youngkin’s approach puts pressure on Virginia Democrats, who control the state Senate: if they oppose the restrictions he supports, they will disagree with most voters. But if he fights for a stricter ban, he risks letting them off the hook.

After nearly five decades of legal abortion – which ended approximately 63.5 million unborn lives – there is an understandable desire to save as many lives as possible. But the pro-life movement must resist the urge to rush through the most restrictive rules in every state and focus instead on enacting lasting restrictions on abortion – while working to persuade more Americans of the sanctity of unborn life.

Many Americans are persuaded. According to the Harvard-Harris poll, 49 percent believe that abortion should be limited to the sixth week of pregnancy or earlier (12%), or only in cases of rape and incest (37%). If Florida Republicans successfully defend their 15-week ban and people see that the world is not over, then, over time, a majority could support further restrictions. But if Republicans push too far, too fast, their efforts could backfire. It is very easy to change state representatives. Pushing for restrictions beyond what the public supports could lead to the election of politicians who want to expand, not restrict, abortion.

Winning hearts and minds also requires increased support for mothers and children after birth. DeSantis understands that. In his State of the State address in January, he Noted that “the protection of life does not stop at the unborn child. It must also include ongoing efforts to promote adoption and foster care so that all Floridians have a fair chance in life. In April he sign a law increasing monthly payments for caregivers, increasing the monthly child care subsidy, and strengthening tuition and fee waiver programs to help adoptive children attend state colleges and programs workforce training.

We need to do more. As my Post colleague Alyssa Rosenberg has pointed out, this is a particularly difficult time for poor parents – with a shortage of formula, high inflation that has driven up the cost of diapers and food, and thousands of daycare centers closed by the pandemic. . The time has come for the pro-life movement to rally around a family-friendly policy platform, such as: expanding refundable tax credits for adoption and reforming the child tax credit to include pregnant women; strengthen child support enforcement; increase nutritional assistance to poor mothers and children; making nappies tax-free and eligible for purchase through health savings accounts; prevent employers from discriminating against pregnant women; allow new parents to use their acquired social security benefits for family leave; adding flexibility to federal block grant programs so that states can find innovative ways to support parents; and improving public education by expanding charter schools and voucher programs.

Michele L. Norris: Republicans roar against abortion. Then they abandon the children.

If Americans see the pro-life movement building a culture of life, a culture that supports women and children after birth, they will be more likely to support the efforts of swing state leaders such as DeSantis to also expand protections for unborn life.

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