Childcare program – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 11:41:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://wendyfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/cropped-icon-32x32.png Childcare program – Wendy Foundation http://wendyfoundation.org/ 32 32 TESS Community Action Center moves to new offices https://wendyfoundation.org/tess-community-action-center-moves-to-new-offices/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 10:56:04 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/tess-community-action-center-moves-to-new-offices/ The Takoma-East Silver Spring Community Action Center has moved from Piney Branch Road to new offices at 8703 Flower Ave., officials said. The TESS Community Action Center is part of the Department of Health and Human Services and has served the Long Branch community for 50 years. Walk-in offices can help connect residents with county […]]]>

The Takoma-East Silver Spring Community Action Center has moved from Piney Branch Road to new offices at 8703 Flower Ave., officials said.

The TESS Community Action Center is part of the Department of Health and Human Services and has served the Long Branch community for 50 years.

Walk-in offices can help connect residents with county services, nonprofit programs, and other resources, providing housing assistance, childcare assistance, assistance with programs such as the Federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Medicaid, IRS Voluntary Tax Assistance, and legal services, in English, Spanish, Amharic, and Farsi.

“I have worked with TESS for decades and understand firsthand how valuable they are to Montgomery County,” County Executive Marc Elrich said in a news release. “I am proud of their service and thank them for the crucial role they play in improving county health and equity outcomes while enriching the lives of those they serve.”

TESS also works with other county agencies on local emergencies, such as fires or floods.

The center is open Monday through Friday, with appointment times available from 9 a.m. to noon. Appointments are available Tuesday through Thursday from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The phone number is 240.777.8260.

DHHS photo via Twitter

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NJ hospital system rolls back controversial plan to end on-site child care https://wendyfoundation.org/nj-hospital-system-rolls-back-controversial-plan-to-end-on-site-child-care/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 19:28:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/nj-hospital-system-rolls-back-controversial-plan-to-end-on-site-child-care/ After protests over its plan to end on-site childcare, Hackensack Meridian Health said on Monday it plans to continue the long-running popular service for its employees, though it may come with a few changes. The health system announced the reversal of weeks after first telling workers that centers would close by September, then extending the […]]]>

After protests over its plan to end on-site childcare, Hackensack Meridian Health said on Monday it plans to continue the long-running popular service for its employees, though it may come with a few changes.

The health system announced the reversal of weeks after first telling workers that centers would close by September, then extending the deadline until December 31.

“After receiving thoughtful feedback from our team members and the community, Hackensack Meridian Health is committed to finding a solution that keeps child care on-site,” said Hackensack spokesperson Mary Jo Layton. Meridian, in a statement to NJ Advance Media.

“Our leaders continue to evaluate all options with that goal in mind,” Layton said. “As we explore the possibilities, we expect all viable solutions to include adjustments to our current operations. Until a way forward is identified, on-site daycares will remain open.

The health system, which employs more than 30,000 workers statewide, told parents in a July letter that it was ending the long-running child care program. He attributed the decision to financial and staffing pressures that made the continuation of centers in various locations “unsustainable”.

The announcement sparked a firestorm of criticism among parent-healthcare workers who rely on the service. They told NJ Advance Media that it offers crucial benefits, such as extended hours and special summer and holiday programs.

Allied Healthcare Professionals and Employees, the state’s largest healthcare union, called the move misguided. He cited the hundreds of millions of dollars in profits the healthcare system makes each year and the pandemic relief funding it has received.

The letter to parents announcing the closure said, “The current child care landscape is rapidly changing, placing significant financial and staffing pressures on organizations providing child care services. Additionally, there is a heavy capital investment required to maintain child care facilities as well as significant requirements in New Jersey.

In the letter, the health system also said it is considering other ways to help employees who need childcare, though it appears to rule out keeping centers onsite.

After the reviews, that all changed.

Some employees told NJ Advance Media last month that they were caught off guard and forced to rush to find an alternative, which is difficult for those in professions with erratic hours and frequently changing schedules.

Workers said the move appeared contrary to pressure from hospitals to deal with severe staffing shortages after many people quit bedside work during the pandemic.

The health system’s child care program, they said, offered longer hours than most conventional centers as well as other benefits, such as on-site pediatricians, at affordable rates.

Hackensack Meridian’s program offered after-school care, as well as the ability to enroll school-aged children during the summer, winter and spring break, employees said.

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Elizabeth Llorente can be reached at ELlorente@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @Liz_Llorente.

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US Senate Democrats get green light on $430 billion climate and drug bill https://wendyfoundation.org/us-senate-democrats-get-green-light-on-430-billion-climate-and-drug-bill/ Sat, 06 Aug 2022 16:23:05 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/us-senate-democrats-get-green-light-on-430-billion-climate-and-drug-bill/ U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) holds a press conference to tout the $430 billion drug, energy and tax bill championed by Democrats on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, August 5, 2022. Jonathan Ernest | Reuters On Saturday, Democrats in the U.S. Senate were expected to advance a bill that would address key items […]]]>

U.S. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) holds a press conference to tout the $430 billion drug, energy and tax bill championed by Democrats on the U.S. Capitol in Washington, August 5, 2022.

Jonathan Ernest | Reuters

On Saturday, Democrats in the U.S. Senate were expected to advance a bill that would address key items on President Joe Biden’s agenda – tackling climate change, lowering the cost of energy and medicine for seniors and obliging certain corporations and wealthy Americans to pay more taxes.

The Senate congressman determined that the lion’s share of health care provisions in the $430 billion bill could be passed by a simple majority, circumventing a filibuster rule requiring 60 votes in the House of Commons. 100 seats to advance most legislation and allowing Democrats to pass against Republican objections, Majority Leader Chuck Schumer said in a statement.

The Senate began its rare weekend session around noon (1600 GMT). Saturday will kick off an arduous process that could drag on into early next week, with senators proposing amendment after amendment in a time-consuming “vote-a-rama.”

Democrats hope the legislation will give their candidates a boost in the Nov. 8 midterm elections in which Biden’s party is in an uphill battle to retain tight control of the Senate and House of Representatives. Democrats touted the legislation as a way to tackle inflation, a top concern for American voters this year.

“Democrats have received some very good news,” Schumer said in the statement. “Medicare will finally be allowed to negotiate drug prices. … This is a major victory for the American people.”

Medicare is the government health insurance program for the elderly and some disabled Americans.

The bill’s tax provisions have three main parts: a 15% minimum corporate tax and closing loopholes the wealthy can use to avoid paying taxes; stricter IRS enforcement; and a new excise tax on share buybacks.

The legislation provides $430 billion in new spending and generates more than $740 billion in new revenue.

Along with billions of dollars to encourage the production and purchase of more electric vehicles and foster clean energy, the bill would establish $4 billion in new federal drought relief funds. The latter is a decision that could help the re-election campaigns of Democratic senators Catherine Cortez Masto in Nevada and Mark Kelly in Arizona.

Senator Tom Carper, chairman of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, said the climate provisions, including the methane emissions reduction program, had been approved by the Senate Congressman.

Republicans have vowed to do whatever they can to block or block the bill.

Democrats aim to push the bill through the Senate using an arcane and convoluted “reconciliation” procedure allowing passage without any Republican support in the house divided 50-50 between the parties, with Democrats in control because the Vice President Kamala Harris may cast a tie-break vote.

A provision deleted from the bill would have required drug companies to refund money to public and private health plans if drug prices rose faster than inflation. The parliamentarian ruled that the measure could not apply to private industry.

Left-leaning senators like Bernie Sanders will likely try to expand the scope of the bill to include new programs such as federal subsidies for child care or home care for the elderly. Republicans have signaled that they will be proposing numerous amendments touching on another issue: immigrants crossing the US border from Mexico.

Several Democratic senators said they would vote against all of the amendments, fearing they would derail a delicately negotiated deal.

“I will be voting NO on all amendments – even the things I love,” Democratic Senator Brian Schatz wrote on Twitter. “I can think of many ways to strengthen it, but I will not derail this bill by supporting changes.”

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Georgia child care staff to receive ‘back-to-school supply supplement’ – On Common Ground News https://wendyfoundation.org/georgia-child-care-staff-to-receive-back-to-school-supply-supplement-on-common-ground-news/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 02:26:20 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/georgia-child-care-staff-to-receive-back-to-school-supply-supplement-on-common-ground-news/ ATLANTA– As schools and child care programs across the state prepare for the start of the 2022-2023 school year, Governor Brian P. Kemp and Commissioner Amy M. Jacobs announced that all Eligible teachers and child care workers in Georgia will receive a second $125 “Back to School Refueling Supplement” through the US bailout. A previous […]]]>

ATLANTA– As schools and child care programs across the state prepare for the start of the 2022-2023 school year, Governor Brian P. Kemp and Commissioner Amy M. Jacobs announced that all Eligible teachers and child care workers in Georgia will receive a second $125 “Back to School Refueling Supplement” through the US bailout. A previous supplement was distributed in spring 2022.

“As we head into a new school year, we will not stop working to provide our educators with the tools they need to set their students on the path to successful lifelong learning,” Kemp said. “We hope this back-to-school supplies supplement will help provide needed resources as they prepare their classrooms and welcome children into safe, secure and productive learning environments.”

“These supplements are designed to support a safe and comprehensive return to in-person learning and for educators who are still struggling with pandemic-caused learning loss in the classroom,” Commissioner Jacobs said. “We are excited to work with the governor’s office to provide this continued support to all eligible teachers and child care staff in Georgia.”

The “Back to School Supply Supplement” will be provided to all child care teachers and select staff, as well as working home child care learning home providers to provide instruction and support services directly to students on a daily basis. It will be $125.00 for each eligible staff member to purchase materials, supplies or other items that can be used for age-appropriate educational purposes and that support learning, growth or development. student development. These permitted educational purposes are to improve instructional materials, remedy learning loss, or further the education of students.

For child care programs, each staff member in an eligible role who has received a POWER Round 3 payment will automatically receive this classroom grant. For the Georgia pre-K program, pre-K home and assistant teacher eligibility will be determined by August teacher data.

Staff members will not receive funds directly. Instead, funds are accessed and must be spent through a provider called ClassWallet. Through the ClassWallet website, recipients may purchase supplies and materials only from vendors approved by DECAL. Funds must be spent by October 31, 2022. Eligible staff members will receive an email directly from ClassWallet that will include instructions for accessing the funds.

For more information about ClassWallet, email info@classwallet.com.



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States boost child care funds as congressional efforts stall https://wendyfoundation.org/states-boost-child-care-funds-as-congressional-efforts-stall/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 14:49:16 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/states-boost-child-care-funds-as-congressional-efforts-stall/ ALBANY, NY — Difficulties in finding affordable childcare cost Enoshja Ruffin her job three years ago. The mother-of-six was fired from her job as a counselor for children with cerebral palsy after missing three shifts because she struggled to find babysitters. After three months on a waiting list, however, she places her children in a […]]]>

ALBANY, NY — Difficulties in finding affordable childcare cost Enoshja Ruffin her job three years ago. The mother-of-six was fired from her job as a counselor for children with cerebral palsy after missing three shifts because she struggled to find babysitters.

After three months on a waiting list, however, she places her children in a daycare whose costs are covered by government subsidies and the daycare’s financial assistance program.

“If I hadn’t received financial aid, I wouldn’t have succeeded. I wouldn’t have a diploma. I’d just be another stat,” said Ruffin, 28, of Utica, New York, who was able to attend college while her kids were in daycare. She now works as an organizer for the liberal political group Citizen Action.

Washington Democrats had big ambitions this year to increase child care subsidies nationwide as part of a sweeping domestic spending bill. But with those plans stalled due to a lack of bipartisan support, some states have moved forward with their own plans.

New York lawmakers passed a state budget in the spring that calls on it to spend $7 billion to make child care more affordable over the next four years.

The legislation will double previous state support for government grants that help families with some or all of their childcare costs. Eligibility will be extended to more middle-income families. Under the new rules, a family of four with an annual household income of up to $83,250 will be eligible for grants.

Last spring, New Mexico raised income eligibility for subsidies to the highest level of any state. A family of four with an annual household income of up to $111,000 can now get at least some government assistance. Through June 2023, New Mexico will also waive child care fees, saving families $400 to $900 per month, depending on their income level.

Rhode Island lawmakers passed a state budget last month that provides a one-time tax credit of $250 per child to help pay for child care, nearly doubles the number of spaces available in child care programs. government-funded nursery school and provides subsidies to child care workers.

All of these measures were aimed at addressing an affordability challenge. In 2019, child care centers in the United States charged an average of $406 per week for children under 18 months, $315 per week for children 18-35 months, and $289 per week for 3-5 year olds.

Ronora James, a daycare center based in Rochester, New York, said it had lost staff to fast food restaurants offering competitive wages.

Child care workers earned an average hourly wage of $13.22 in the United States in May 2021, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The minimum wage in New York ranges from $13.20 to $15 per hour, depending on the part of the state.

“People have to go where the money is to survive, and that’s a problem for us,” James said.

“In New York, we have some of the highest minimum wages in the country, but a minimum wage worker must work 26 weeks at minimum wage to pay for child care for their family,” said New York Governor Kathy Hochul. a Democrat, said Monday at an event promoting state investments in child care. “It’s too much to ask of our families.”

Although child care has seen growing bipartisan support in recent years, some Republican leaders are cautious about expanding government assistance.

“I support moves to create more quality, accessible, and reliable child care options, especially as costs continue to rise,” said the GOP House Minority Leader. of New York, William Barclay, in a statement. “However, as we have seen repeatedly in state programs, the level of spending and how funds are distributed need to be closely monitored. Too often, state-run programs spiral out of control and fail to deliver the services intended. Despite the Governor’s lofty promises, we cannot allow this to happen here.

New York’s legislation also increased state reimbursements to child care providers, which the industry said was needed to help centers remain financially viable.

Since January 2020, the number of center and family child care centers in the state has decreased by about 1,326, according to Pete Nabozny, director of policy for The Children’s Agenda. Most of these programs are run by women and people of color, he said.

Some New York lawmakers say they eventually want to make child care available for free starting in kindergarten. Senator Jessica Ramos and Assemblywoman Sarah Clark, both Democrats, said they hope to garner support in the state’s next legislative session for more changes, including expanding eligibility even further. and increasing provider compensation.

“I think childcare is one of the few places where it’s hard to fix a piece of it. You have to repair the whole system at once. Hopefully we can continue to build on what we’ve done so far and do more,” Clark said.

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Maysoon Khan is a member of the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places reporters in local newsrooms to report on underreported issues. Follow Maysoon Khan on Twitter.

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DSS shares what parents need to know before choosing a child care provider, warning signs to look out for https://wendyfoundation.org/dss-shares-what-parents-need-to-know-before-choosing-a-child-care-provider-warning-signs-to-look-out-for/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 01:23:00 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/dss-shares-what-parents-need-to-know-before-choosing-a-child-care-provider-warning-signs-to-look-out-for/ COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) — The South Carolina Department of Social Services details the types of things parents should know before choosing a child care provider and the warning signs to look out for at these centers. It comes after additional charges were brought against Shayna McKnight, 36, a former worker at Windsor Academy Child Development […]]]>

COLUMBIA, SC (WIS) — The South Carolina Department of Social Services details the types of things parents should know before choosing a child care provider and the warning signs to look out for at these centers.

It comes after additional charges were brought against Shayna McKnight, 36, a former worker at Windsor Academy Child Development Centre, for alleged child abuse.

RELATED STORY | More abuse charges announced for former Windsor Academy daycare worker

On Thursday, the Lexington County Sheriff’s Department charged McKnight with three counts of child cruelty and two counts of unlawful conduct toward a child.

In April, McKnight was charged with causing grievous bodily harm to a child.

RELATED STORY | Three people arrested in connection with child abuse investigation at Lexington daycare center

A video discovered by LCSD allegedly shows McKnight tucking a child’s legs under the child’s body and rolling the child over in a crib while holding the child’s left leg.

The LCSD arrested Amy Grice and Jeannie Locklear, the center’s director, for allegedly trying to hide video evidence of this incident. They were charged with obstruction of justice.

Windsor Academy officially closed on May 13, exactly two weeks after the first arrests.

According to the DSS, which monitors, inspects and licenses daycare centers across the state, parents should always research the provider before sending their children there.

If parents aren’t sure where to start, DSS has developed a website that allows them to explore a number of details about each operating child care center in South Carolina.

“The Department of Social Services, through our Early Care and Education Division, has launched scchildcare.org, and it is a one-stop resource website for parents and guardians who are looking for child care in this state,” Connelly-Anne Ragley, DSS Director of Communications and External Affairs said.

On the site, parents can view contact information, hours of operation, and any recent DSS reports, filings, or complaints against the child care provider.

The state also operates a voluntary evaluation system, called the ABC Quality Improvement and Evaluation System.

“Centers that participate in the ABC Quality Program go above and beyond the state’s minimum standards for licensing in this state,” Ragley said.

The DSS has developed a resource guide to help parents through this process.

The search should also include touring the center, meeting staff and asking key questions, the DSS said.

According to Ragley, important questions parents may want to ask include: How many employees are there on staff? Are there cameras in the classrooms? How many entry points are there? Are each of these doors occupied? What is the supplier’s recruitment and retention policy?

Rebecca Unrue, a former Windsor Academy mother, expressed a similar sentiment after the initial arrests.

RELATED STORY | Windsor Academy reopens amid child abuse investigation

“It’s a great learning experience for parents when you look at child care, questions I wouldn’t have thought to ask originally, I will definitely ask in the future,” she said. declared. “Want to know more about who the owner is, how involved they are and how often they are on site to do visits and checks? These are things I will be more aware of.

As for the warning signs, Ragley said it starts with “staying alert.” She said parents should be on the lookout for unexplained bruises a child might have received during the day.

She said parents should bring these concerns to the attention of the childcare center first.

“If you don’t receive a response or a clarification that you like, there are options where you can report it to the DSS where we can go out and investigate the daycare,” Ragley said.

A former Windsor Academy parent told WIS on Friday that she has still been unable to find a center for her child since the provider closed in mid-May.

Ragley said the DSS is actively working to increase the number of centers in the state and has used federal funds through the American Rescue Plan Act to encourage existing centers to expand capacity.

When asked what she would say to parents who have heightened security concerns in light of the Windsor Academy arrests, Ragley said any parent or guardian who feels this should contact the service provider directly. on guard.

“Tell them your concerns,” she said. “Speak to your child’s teacher or co-teacher in your class and tell them that you are concerned and have seen this recent example on the news, and check with the director of child care at this center and let him know your concerns as well.”

DSS also runs a voucher program that aims to help families in South Carolina cover child care costs.

According to the DSS, 33,200 children have been approved for vouchers through the SC voucher program.

Additionally, $398 million has been allocated to the program since October 2020, when DSS began offering additional child care assistance programs for working parents in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For more information on how to apply, you can visit the SC Child Care website.

Copyright 2022 WIS. All rights reserved.

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Colorado awards $21.5 million to help child care industry | Content reserved for subscribers https://wendyfoundation.org/colorado-awards-21-5-million-to-help-child-care-industry-content-reserved-for-subscribers/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 02:00:16 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/colorado-awards-21-5-million-to-help-child-care-industry-content-reserved-for-subscribers/ The state has awarded $21.5 million in grants to child care organizations across Colorado to help address challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The Department of Early Years distributed the money through the Community Innovation and Resilience for Care and Learning Equity (CIRCLE) grant program, funded by federal COVID-19 relief funds from the American Rescue […]]]>

The state has awarded $21.5 million in grants to child care organizations across Colorado to help address challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Department of Early Years distributed the money through the Community Innovation and Resilience for Care and Learning Equity (CIRCLE) grant program, funded by federal COVID-19 relief funds from the American Rescue Plan Act and the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act.

Nearly 200 organizations in 52 counties received one-year grants, averaging more than $110,000 each. The funds went to 106 early care and education providers, 19 early childhood councils, and 63 statewide and local nonprofit organizations.

“In the wake of the pandemic, this support is absolutely essential,” said Lisa Roy, executive director of the Colorado Department of Early Childhood. “The Department of Early Childhood is delighted to fund projects that promote innovation and equity in our early childhood system, ensuring that the organizations that care for our youngest Coloradans and their families are well supported.”

Grant recipients can use the money to fund projects to make child care more affordable, close gaps in infant and toddler care, strengthen the workforce child care services, expand business support and promote children’s health, development and education.

It comes as Colorado struggles with an acute shortage of child care that the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated.

In Colorado, the average family with two young children spends $28,600 a year on child care, according to federal data, and single parents pay an average of 49.5% of their income for child care, according to a Child Care Aware of America report.

Some families cannot find child care at all.

In Colorado, 51% of residents live in “childcare deserts,” where there are more than three times as many children as there are licensed childcare slots, according to Mile High United Way. .

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic caused the closure of about 7% of Colorado’s licensed child care centers, providers only had the capacity to serve 62% of the state’s 246,000 children under age 6. whose parents are both working, according to a report cited 2019 figures. That meant a shortage of more than 90,000 child care spaces statewide.

The CIRCLE Grant program was one of four child care grant programs created by Senate Bill 236, which lawmakers passed in 2021. It’s part of a wave of recent legislation approved by the makers to boost the child care industry, including a $100 million investment that went into effect this month.

“We are proud to partner with Governor Polis and the Colorado Department of Early Childhood to support the CIRCLE initiative,” said Jennifer Stedron, executive director of Early Milestones Colorado, which administered the grants. “This significant investment advances innovation and equity for our state’s young children, their families, and the providers who serve them every day.”

The CIRCLE program will distribute another round of grants in August.

Licensed child care and early childhood education organizations can apply for the grants August 1-26 at earlymilestones.org or by emailing circle@earlymilestones.org.

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Grants Ensure Inclusion of Afghan Refugees in the United States https://wendyfoundation.org/grants-ensure-inclusion-of-afghan-refugees-in-the-united-states/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 07:19:14 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/grants-ensure-inclusion-of-afghan-refugees-in-the-united-states/ More than 76,000 Afghan refugees have entered the United States since the U.S. military left their country in August 2021. Long-term, sustained support is critical to their successful resettlement. To this end, the WES Mariam Assefa Fund provides assistance beyond the basic needs of refugees by providing $200,000 in grants aimed at building communities that […]]]>

More than 76,000 Afghan refugees have entered the United States since the U.S. military left their country in August 2021. Long-term, sustained support is critical to their successful resettlement. To this end, the WES Mariam Assefa Fund provides assistance beyond the basic needs of refugees by providing $200,000 in grants aimed at building communities that are both welcoming and inclusive for Afghans.

A notable challenge for refugees is the short-term nature of assistance, as most agencies provide resettlement services for just 90 days, said Lauren Crain, associate director of US strategy and programs for the fund. The fund rewards programs that go beyond temporary support efforts by strengthening communities and workplaces through the engagement of businesses, nonprofits and other funders. Examples include assistance in navigating government resources, access to transportation, opportunities to learn English and other skills, job placement assistance, and childcare.

“It is important that the system shifts from humanitarian response to building inclusive communities,” Crain said. “This includes employers, but also local government, schools, religious organizations and more, and where models like community sponsorship play an important role.”

Recent $200,000 grants were awarded to the following organizations: Community Services Agency (COMSA) in Green Bay, Wisconsin; Immigrant Advocates Response Collaborative (I-ARC) in upstate New York; Ohlone College in Fremont, California; and the TIS Foundation in Washington, D.C. Since its launch in 2019, the fund has partnered with more than 90 organizations in the United States and Canada, distributing more than $14.7 million to support refugees and immigrants.

Wanted: Companies Committed to Employing Afghan Refugees

Businesses have the opportunity to strengthen resettlement efforts by working to employ newly arrived refugees. Several of the Mariam Assefa Fund’s grantee partners, including I-ARC and Upwardly Global, offer support to employers looking to hire refugees and offer other opportunities to engage, such as CV reviews or simulations. interviews, Crain added. Another partner, Welcome.us, connects employers with job-seeking refugees.

Throughout the history of the United States, immigrants have played a vital role in building the country’s economy. With low unemployment rates and many industries struggling to find skilled workers, successful resettlement and employment of immigrants is increasingly important to maintaining a healthy economy. For Afghan refugees, the United States has an additional responsibility to help them thrive in their new communities after the rapid withdrawal of troops in 2021 following a 20-year war in Afghanistan.

“Fully activating their economic potential will benefit individual immigrants and refugees as well as our economy and communities,” Crain added. “Immigrants and refugees come to our country to live with dignity and respect and build a future for their families, and they deserve access to quality education and jobs that value their identity and lived experience.

Workforce training leading to careers in high-demand fields

The Ohlone College grant is an example of funds for vocational training. The college is based in the Bay Area city of Fremont, which is home to one of the largest Afghan refugee populations in the United States, Crain noted. Through the grant, refugees from Afghanistan and Ukraine are enrolling in an eight-week training program, joining a smart tech cohort in college. The education program, which includes industry certification and paid apprenticeships, leads to jobs starting at $20 an hour with career paths for advancement at companies such as Tesla.

Meanwhile, COMSA is working to help Afghans in the Green Bay area, where approximately 1,200 refugees are being resettled. The non-profit organization provides comprehensive services such as transportation and English language training for school-aged children, mental health counseling and culturally appropriate child care.

As US troops withdrew last summer, among the most lingering images are thousands of Afghan refugees fleeing their homes and leaving behind jobs, family and friends. Nearly a year after the departure of the United States from Afghanistan, grants from the Mariam Assefa Fund not only help to ensure the social and economic inclusion of these people, but also maintain the plight and long-term needs of refugees at the forefront in their new communities.

Image credit: Nasim Dadfar via Unsplash

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As Chicago Guaranteed Income Pilot Launches, Leaders Hope to See Work Replicated | Black voices | Chicago News https://wendyfoundation.org/as-chicago-guaranteed-income-pilot-launches-leaders-hope-to-see-work-replicated-black-voices-chicago-news/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 17:29:56 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/as-chicago-guaranteed-income-pilot-launches-leaders-hope-to-see-work-replicated-black-voices-chicago-news/ Chicago and Cook County are launching guaranteed income programs that will provide more than 8,000 residents with $500 a month, no strings attached. While applications for Cook County residents will open in the fall, residents chosen for Chicago’s Resilient Communities program have already started receiving monthly payments. According to city data, 176,000 people applied for […]]]>

Chicago and Cook County are launching guaranteed income programs that will provide more than 8,000 residents with $500 a month, no strings attached.

While applications for Cook County residents will open in the fall, residents chosen for Chicago’s Resilient Communities program have already started receiving monthly payments.

According to city data, 176,000 people applied for the program. Among these candidates:

• 64% live below the poverty line
• 68% identify as black or African American
• 70% of candidates identified as a woman
• 17% mentioned having a disability
• 9% indicated that they live in insecure housing or are homeless

Audra Wilson, president and CEO of the Shriver Center on Poverty Law, said providing unlimited cash supplements is a crucial aspect of the program.

“Direct cash payments make a huge difference for families. It gives individuals the agency to invest in what best suits their needs, whether they’re starting a business, keeping a roof over their heads, feeding their families or caring for children,” Wilson said. . “It’s very different from many existing social safety net programs that have work requirements or can suddenly eliminate assistance when individuals receive a modest increase in income.”

The possibility of increased income negatively affecting participants was one of many complications considered by the Chicago Department of Family Support and Services, which is responsible for administering the program.

Department Commissioner Brandie Knazze said her staff lobbied for waivers for SNAP and SSI recipients.

“We really thought about… the cliff of benefits. We didn’t want anyone to say, ‘You know what, I could use $500, but I’m on another social service program. And so I don’t want to lose my SNAP benefits or my SSI,” Knazze said. “Fifty-six percent of those who applied also had SNAP benefits…we learned that other cities were excluding these populations because they didn’t want them to be negatively affected.”

Knazze said ensuring news of the program reached those most in need was a difficult task.

“One of the first things we wanted to do was to make sure the program targeted caregivers and parents. We know that during the pandemic many people have had to take time off from their regular duties to stay home to take online classes or care for loved ones,” she said. “But we knew that on top of that there were hard-to-reach populations that we wanted to reach. So we wanted to make sure that those who were undocumented, domestic workers or people who didn’t speak English as their first language, that we really reached out to them.

These messengers were a number of outreach partner organizations, including the YWCA of Metropolitan Chicago. CEO Nicole Robinson described how the YWCA carried out outreach activities for the pilot.

“There are so many people in Chicago who, even before the pandemic, were dealing with job loss, food insecurity, housing insecurity, child care and it’s stressful . And what this program does is not just fill the gaps in those areas, but it actually provides some relief,” Robinson said. “We were in the community, boots on the ground, and had a coalition of hundreds of partners across this city, all committed and unified around this one idea of ​​making sure residents were in the know. So that means we were in churches and faith-based institutions, we were in hair salons, we were in laundromats, we were door-to-door, working with many partners to spread the word.

Guaranteed income programs like those in Chicago and Cook County have the potential to significantly advance racial and economic justice, Wilson said.

“The concept of guaranteed income has been championed by civil rights leaders for decades, including Dr. King himself, as a solution to fight racial and economic justice. And it’s a very bold but simple approach to tackling poverty and reducing economic insecurity,” Wilson said. “Across the country, these pilot projects have…measurably improved people’s financial stability. But I think it’s important to note that the launch of this pilot project in the third largest city in the country, at the same time as the Cook County Guaranteed Income pilot project, which is launching the second most populous county in the countries, is extremely important as these joint pilot projects can promote national dialogue on guaranteed income and can help shape broader national initiatives.


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Proposed changes to the code of daycare centers and the expansion of childcare in Moscow https://wendyfoundation.org/proposed-changes-to-the-code-of-daycare-centers-and-the-expansion-of-childcare-in-moscow/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 17:30:49 +0000 https://wendyfoundation.org/proposed-changes-to-the-code-of-daycare-centers-and-the-expansion-of-childcare-in-moscow/ MOSCOW – Proposed amendments to the child care code were presented to the Moscow City Council on Monday, July 18. Changes to the child care code that were introduced through a review process that began in 2019 working with child care providers to review municipal child care bylaws to assess whether changes could be made […]]]>
MOSCOW – Proposed amendments to the child care code were presented to the Moscow City Council on Monday, July 18. Changes to the child care code that were introduced through a review process that began in 2019 working with child care providers to review municipal child care bylaws to assess whether changes could be made to increase capacity and access to child care centres.

In general, the Moscow Child Care Code is stricter than the Idaho State Child Care Code, and many of the amendments discussed brought the Moscow Code closer to being more like the state code. Some of the amendments would include increasing the child-to-provider ratio to allow for more children to be admitted.

The current code and proposed changes are available here. Some of the suggested changes were to increase ratios and the points system to increase the number of children per child care provider. City Council heard from affected child care providers, parents and community members during the public comment period.

Dulce Kersting-Lark spoke during the public comment period and shared that the childcare deficit in Moscow is too large for these amendments to adequately address the shortage of infant care and childcare available in Moscow. She feels that the problem is too big for these changes to solve the problem.

The child care gap in Moscow, Idaho, according to childcaregap.org, a bipartisan political group, is 290 to 290 children who potentially need child care in Moscow, Idaho. The same policy group also estimates potential revenue loss, looking at lost household income, lost business productivity and the impact on tax revenue. The immediate potential loss of annual revenue for Moscow is estimated at $5.2 million at the low end and $8.2 million at the high end.

The long-term revenue loss for Moscow due to the childcare deficit is estimated at $13.3 million at the low end and $20.3 million at the high end. Another community member shared that Idaho is only 1 in 4 states that do not provide state-funded early childhood care. This report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office confirms that officials in four states — Idaho, New Hampshire, South Dakota and Wyoming — said they had no state preschool program.

The Idaho Chamber Alliance’s legislative priorities are to support education and child care policies that will strengthen our workforce by supporting on-site or cooperative child care options in businesses to facilitate the returning Idahoans in caretaking positions to the workforce, supporting opportunities for early expansion-early childhood education and advocating for continuous improvement for teachers.

Earlier this year, Governor Little recommended to the Idaho Legislature that $50 million in federal ARPA funds be distributed through the Workforce Development Council to expand health services. in-state child care and provide child care expansion grants. This initial figure of $50 million was reduced to $15 million during the last legislative session.

From the Idaho Workforce Development Council on expanding child care in the state of Idaho: “Child care is one of the most critical for parents to successfully participate in the labor market. Since the pandemic, labor force participation rates in Idaho have declined, and one of the main factors is the lack of child care options. According to Idaho’s most recent child care gap assessment, 74,670 children have a potential need for child care, and there are only 55,850 child care spaces.

The first round of Child Care Expansion Grant applications must be submitted by August 1, 2022, but one of the eligibility requirements for the Child Care Expansion Grant is that the entity must comply with local and state child care licensing requirements. In a state that does not offer publicly funded child care, it is essential that our local child care centers are able to meet the eligibility criteria to apply for grants through the Development Council. workforce or the Idaho Department of Health and Wellness.

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