Single dad defies the odds follows his heart to foster, adopt

A foster and adoptive father follows his calling in life to be a single father and make the children feel known, seen and heard. He has a pair of younger foster siblings, a 16-year-old and an 18-year-old living with him who have all had another chance. Mutabazi and his children sat with WXII 12’s Audrey Biesk in a home filled with love and laughter, but it wasn’t always this way for him. Growing up on the streets of Uganda, he was told he didn’t matter. He ran away from an abusive family and at the age of 10 he was left on his own. Mutabazi said it was until the kindness of strangers welcomed him. “Someone saw potential in me when I couldn’t see it and despite what I’ve been through. Yes, our children have suffered trauma and gone through difficult times, but they are just ordinary children who want to be loved and who want to be known,” he said. Mutabazi said he decided to give back to the vulnerable what was so freely given to him. When he arrived in America to receive his foster license, he realized he was the only single black man and said color would not determine if he could be a dad. people peek or bat an attitude, for me I don’t focus on the noise outside,” he said. “I am their father and I love what I do.” Mutabazi took to social media to document his journey over the past five years using his platform on Instagram and TikTok to reach hundreds of thousands of people. dad to kids who don’t look like me but at the same time changing the novelty that yes we can be good dads and change lives and that’s what I am,” Mutabazi said. Those lives include Anthony, 16 years old, who entered the foster system at the age of two and was abandoned in hospital at 11. Mutabazi took him in for what was supposed to be a weekend, but he didn’t is never gone. Anthony is adopted and has his forever family. “My message to other kids in foster care is that you shouldn’t give up hope,” Anthony said. “There is someone who loves you and who takes care of you even if you haven’t. I haven’t found them yet. Xavier found himself in Peter’s care when he was an older teenager. Now he is 18 and living in his fourth foster home, receiving the support he needs as an adult. “He’s part of our family, sometimes we define adoption like it’s the paperwork that defines a family.” Mutabazi said, “I like what he says – family isn’t defined by paper, but family is defined by love.” in Greensboro on May 12 in support of the Children’s Home Society of North Carolina . To register and participate click here.

A foster and adoptive father follows his call in life to be a single father and make the children feel known, seen and heard.

Peter Mutabazi has given several children a warm place to call home. He has a pair of younger foster siblings, a 16-year-old and an 18-year-old living with him who have all had another chance.

Mutabazi and his children sat with WXII 12’s Audrey Biesk in a home filled with love and laughter, but it wasn’t always this way for him.

Growing up on the streets of Uganda, he was told he didn’t matter. He ran away from an abusive family and at the age of 10 he was left on his own. Mutabazi said it was until the kindness of strangers welcomed him.

“Someone saw potential in me when I didn’t see it and despite what I’ve been through. Yes, our kids have been through trauma and been through tough times, but they’re just ordinary kids who want to be loved and known,” he said.

Mutabazi said he decided to give back to the vulnerable what was so generously given to him. When he arrived in America to receive his foster license, he realized he was the only single black man and said color would not determine if he could be a dad.

“As you can see we look different, sometimes the police stop us or people look at us or stare at us, for me I don’t focus on the noise outside,” he said. declared. “I’m their dad and I love what I do.

Mutabazi took to social media to document his journey over the past five years using his platform on instagram and ICT Tac reach hundreds of thousands of people.

“It was a joy to be the father of children who are not like me, but at the same time to change the newness that yes we can be good fathers and change lives and that is who I am”, Mutabazi said.

Those lives include 16-year-old Anthony, who entered the foster system aged two and was abandoned in hospital aged 11. Mutabazi took him in for what was supposed to be a weekend, but he never left. Anthony is adopted and has his family forever.

“My message to other foster kids is that you shouldn’t give up hope,” Anthony said. “There’s someone out there who loves you and cares for you even though you haven’t found them yet.”

Xavier found himself in Peter’s care as a teenager. Now he is 18 and living in his fourth foster home, receiving the support he needs as an adult.

“He’s part of our family, sometimes we define adoption like it’s the paperwork that defines a family.” Mutabazi said, “I like what he says – family is not defined by paper, but family is defined by love.”

Click on here to learn more about Mutabzai’s new book titled “Now I’m Known‘.

He is the guest speaker at the annual “A Place to Call Home” luncheon in Greensboro on May 12 in support of the Children’s Home Society of North Carolina. To register and participate, click here.

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